Hello.

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

"The April rain, the April rain,
Comes slanting down in fitful showers,
Then from the furrow shoots the grain,
And banks are fledged with nestling flowers;
And in grey shawl and woodland bowers
The cuckoo through the April rain
Calls once again."

Mathilde Blind, April Rain
When you first apply to join the forum, you will have to wait a while to be approved. Just be patient.

Once you are a member, don't forget to check the calendar(s) for session times. Sessions are held on different platforms, so be sure to find out where the session will take place:-

Speaking Practice

LEN English sessions:-
http://www.learnenglish.de/calendar/learnenglishcalendar.html

Listening Practice 24/7

English radio playlists:-
http://www.englishradio.be/musicevents/calendar.html

Do purpils in your country need need to spend money on private tutoring after school?

lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
Hi guys, now there is an important meeting in China, and there are lots of news every day about Chinese, but the one which I pay most of my attention is education. Our educational deparment contiues to promot its principle which askes students to finish studying at 3.30pm and must leave school after 3.30. The problem is parents of those students have to work in the office at 3.30, and the government does not give us an effective method to pick up and take care of our children after 3.30 pm. There is only way we can choose, that is private tutoring schools which are commonly expensive but the effects are not always effectively. Do your government pose the same stupid discipline ? The expense of private tutoring after school is a huge proportion of one famliy's budget, so most of parents have to work very hard or they can affrod it.
«1

Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,139 mod
    I think that if private tuition is needed that this means that the school has failed in some way. There are always exceptional circumstances like if the child has missed school for some reason and needs to catch up.

    It can be a problem that school finishes before parents get home from the office. I remember when I was at primary school, some of my classmates were what was called 'latch-key children,' going home to an empty house.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    No one can understand the thoughts or disciplines of government posted now, althought there are lots of disagreed ideas, they do what they want, or maybe that is the educational industry. Who knows? @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,139 mod
    Right now I am not sure there is a single country in the world that has politics that aren't crazy in some way @lisa.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    edited March 7
    Chinese government is especially crazy in recent years, and there are even not any opposite thoughts in the official newspapers or forums, can you imagine? @mheredge
    It is trure that there are people living under poverty levels in China, but they will be leave from poverty group in the near future, maybe in 2020, there is a joke amongst my colleagues, we perhaps will be slaughtered by the government in 2020, because we will be still living under poverty levels in 2020.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,139 mod
    I know that the Chinese government is very repressive @lisa. I was mortified when I saw Trump joking (or not) that he perhaps should try to become president for life. :s
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Do you know Chinese government wants to revise the constitution this year? Now they are discussing it and without any hesitations, they will amend the constitution as they like. One of the most important discipline in the former constitution is the reign of the president of China can not exceed more than 10 years, now this discipline will be changed. Maybe there will be a president for his life in the near future in China. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,139 mod
    How old is the current president @lisa?
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    edited March 8
    He was born in 1953, but there is a regulation in Chinese constitution that is the age of president should be at least 60 years old, so he is still young, and he has had a reign, this one is the second reign of him. @mheredge Chinese government has been always manipulating by an sophiticated group of oldlies.
  • walterwalter Posts: 177 ✭✭
    In my country a lot of pupils spent money for the private tutors. It`s a completly normal, but I don`t agree with that completely. My opinion is the primarly the pupils must to try on your own to learn this material and if you don`t might to overcome that materrial, then they could to hire private tutor. The most pupils seeks a private tutors for mathematics and related discipline.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    The problem is teachers do not teach all of the knowledges to their students, which means students must pay extra money to their teachers, or they can not learn all the knowledges from their teachers. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,139 mod
    I think it shows a failing of the education system and schools if extra tuition is needed @walter.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    That is the "trophy" of Chinese education innovation, ridiculously, most students can not earn the tution fee after graduating from the university, so what is the purpose of Chinese education?
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,139 mod
    My mother used to sometimes give French lessons to school children who need extra lessons after school and even this, I would consider a failing of the school because they generally teach French so badly in the UK @lisa. I had to do extra maths at one point (my fault and not the teachers, because I'm a dunce at maths), but I just used to ask the teachers for extra homework. They gave it to me, I did the extra work and then I managed to get through my exams.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    It seems that paying off teachers is the normal, without bribing, parents are worried about the bullyings from teachers to their children, what a shame! Teacher is a sacred carrer in my mind, and I respect all of my teachers very much, all of my teachers tried their best to teach us as much knowledge as they can, but everything seems to be changed now, although I disagree with the actions of bribing teachers, I have to follow them, because I do not want my daughter to be ostracized in her school by teachers or her classmates, in fact, she just begins her kindergarden time. It is dispirting for any parents in this kind of condition, and where is the future for our nation, I have to ask. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,139 mod
    Bribing teachers to give the students pass marks? Does this happen in China @lisa? I mentioned in another topic how teachers colluded with students taking their school leaving certificate one time at the village school that I support in Nepal. The students had to resit the exam when this was discovered.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Not to pass marks but for extra care or equality with other students. I am so shy to discuss this with you, and it is really a disaster for the parents because almost 30% or more of their salaries have to spend on children's education, besides this, they have to pay housing loans, their own health care, and that sort of expense. @mheredge Every other sutdent's parents has bribed teachers, if there is only one student's parents did not do it, can you imagine what would happen to that unique student? Ostracism and maybe discrimination.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,139 mod
    I am still shocked that teachers accept money from parents to give their students pass marks in the exams @lisa. This is useless for the student who passes without actually having the ability to get through. What happens when they go to university or are the university teachers all bribed in the same way?
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Bribing teachers is not for passing marks but paying attention or treating their children equally, or their children might be ostracized. Who knows? @mheredge
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Sorry I was a bit busy in the passed two days, and this article is a bit long for me but I have finished it last night. I do not know the life of upper-class of China, but I rememberd one news about the two daughters of Putin, they studied in their home instead of school, so I think their tutors are whom the article mentioned.

    Both of their jobs and salaries are descent, but most of them are 24 hours online, I think, and this kind of job is a bit torturing, because you have deal with kinds of issues related with the family. I can not tolerate this kind of life although the salary is descent. @mheredge
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 910 ✭✭✭
    edited March 16
    In Russia many middle class parents typically spend on private tution on regular basis, especially in high school when the child needs it to enter a university. Many better universities have very high admission standards with which most secondary schools can't keep up. Those universities typically offer 2-3 years long preparation courses for a fee.

    I remember that we spent 1/4 of my income on all kinds of extra education when my daughter was working to enter a university. She had two private lessons in math per week, two in economics (which isn't taught at schools here, but she could participate in the competitions which winners were awarded with admission). She also had a two lessons in English and in two in French, the latter by the missus who is a professor of French. A lesson was 1.5-2 hours long. All those activities meant additional homework to do. As for the school, we didn't care for her performance in some subjects in which she wouldn't have taken an entrance exam, 'C's were considered enough. The school teachers didn't mind, though.

    And, I must say, this work has been awarded by a well-paid job in a good company.

    My wife, in her turn, graduated as a professional pianoist as her first degree, and while in the Soviet Union professional classical music education for children was government-funded, anyone aspiring a professional career needed private lessons in addition to this.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Maybe those are drawbacks during the development of education, buy I really want those setbacks to pass as soon as possible, not only because of financial burdens but also we need real education or knowledge for our children. I have never participated any private tutorials until now, and hope my daughter does not need to take part in those private ones, either. @Practical_Severard
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 910 ✭✭✭
    > @lisa said:
    > Maybe those are drawbacks during the development of education, buy I really want those setbacks to pass as soon as possible, not only because of financial burdens but also we need real education or knowledge for our children. I have never participated any private tutorials until now, and hope my daughter does not need to take part in those private ones, either. @Practical_Severard

    As we wanted to ensure that our daughter would have taken a better social position than ours, we invested much in her education and upbringing, because a goal like this requires participation in the Red Queen's race, @lisa . Quality of a country's public education system can't make it different, since it's a competitive sport.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    One of the responsibilities of public education is to make equal opportunities for all children, not only the ones from richer families, if they could not meet this demand, then public education system should consider its duty, in my mind. If education could not help people to change their intrinsic social class, then what could change the fixing social classes. @Practical_Severard
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 910 ✭✭✭
    > @lisa said:
    > One of the responsibilities of public education is to make equal opportunities for all children, not only the ones from richer families, if they could not meet this demand, then public education system should consider its duty, in my mind. If education could not help people to change their intrinsic social class, then what could change the fixing social classes. @Practical_Severard

    A public system must give a chance to everyone, and whether the pupil takes it or misses it is his personal (or his parents' choice). That's good enough. A hardworking talented poor kid will rise anyway, may be not that high if his parents had the money. On the other hand, a rich kid having all the resources available will go down. Social rise is a question of the person's or his family's culture, not of their resources.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    edited March 16
    Private tution fees are too high to be affored by the lower social class, then how their children can rise to upper-class? Hardworking is not enough in modern society, now the inequality is a common worldwide phonomenon. If you and your wife could not have enough money to affford your daughter's tution fee, could she be as successful as now? @Practical_Severard Maybe my thought is a bit ultra, but most of people have the same concerns as mine.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,139 mod
    I agree with @Practical_Severard @lisa. I think that if a student wants to do well, they will regardless of how much money is thrown at their education. It is just a lot tougher if they don't have money, but sometimes I wonder how worthwhile it is to spend a lot of extra tuition if the child is not really that interested in the first place. I've always got by with hard work myself and it's worked fine for me.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 910 ✭✭✭
    edited March 17
    > @lisa said:
    > Private tution fees are too high to be affored by the lower social class, then how their children can rise to upper-class? Hardworking is not enough in modern society, now the inequality is a common worldwide phonomenon. If you and your wife could not have enough money to affford your daughter's tution fee, could she be as successful as now? @Practical_Severard Maybe my thought is a bit ultra, but most of people have the same concerns as mine.

    >@mheredge said:
    I think that if a student wants to do well, they will regardless of how much money is thrown at their education.
    Totally agree.

    The most important thing about this that a child must have passion and if he has he will succeed anyway. It may take more time or work but a passionate person is drastically empowered. This is way more important than money.
    Any child from any family can take a decent place in life. Maybe not so high as he can but moaning about little money is nothing more than an excuse for screwing up a person's life.

    Parents are the people to convert their children into such people since children naturally want three things only: food, sleeping and playing. And they won't want anything else if they don't get motivated by their parents or receive a kick from life itself.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    I have to admit that I am a bit anxiety, because nowadays almost all of children have been taking part in various extracurricular classes in China, which makes me a bit anxious and confused about my daughter's education. @mheredge @Practical_Severard
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 910 ✭✭✭
    > @lisa said:
    > I have to admit that I am a bit anxiety, because nowadays almost all of children have been taking part in various extracurricular classes in China, which makes me a bit anxious and confused about my daughter's education. @mheredge @Practical_Severard

    So all you need to do is putting down your educational goals and learn what a child can and can't do because of her and strong and weaks sides. We could discuss it if you provided the details.
Sign In or Register to comment.