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"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February
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Journeys from hell

mheredgemheredge TeacherHere and therePosts: 29,840 mod
Have you had a journey from hell? Where everything breakdown or goes wrong? When you wonder if you will every arrive in one piece? Maybe just a short road journey, or a long sea voyage and a storm comes up?

Maybe the most scary flight I ever had was one time coming into land at Gatwick Airport when instead of touching down, we carried on, flying low and the pilot announced his apologies, telling us we were too close to the previous plane! We then circled for I don't know how long before we eventually landed safely.

Here is a recent story of a flight from Sydney to Kuala Lumpur that was forced to divert to Alice Springs on Thursday afternoon for “technical reasons” when loud banging noises were heard from the righthand side of the plane and shaking.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jan/19/passengers-recount-hell-malaysia-airlines-plane-alice-springs?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H+categories&utm_term=261029&subid=11006640&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2

Then of course there are the less scary journeys from hell like this one! This poor passenger wants to travel from Manchester trying to get information from Traintracker, an automated information service.



Share any stories you have!

Comments

  • VokVok Posts: 310 ✭✭
    Yes, I have! A few years ago I travelled to Indonesia where we trekked up two volcanos in Java. After having done quite a laborious ascending to the Ijen volcano we were supposed to have some respite on the beautiful island of Gili Travangan however, unfortunately, our plans didn't come to fruition - the speedboat from Bali had been cancelled due to the bad weather conditions. Not having much time left, we decided to get as close as possible to the island by plane and then charter a boat to the island from there. Cut the long story short we ended up in a small motorboat crossing a strait from Lombok to Travangan in the middle of the night in the pitch-darkness. Only when I was back home did I read on TripAdvisor that it wasn't the best idea to say the least. Even though the lights from the island were visible from the opposite side of the strait it seemed to me it took us ages to get there. Had I known before that there'd be such big waves, I wouldn't have stepped into the boat in the first place. We tried to drive parallel to the waves because it was impossible to drive the other way without being capsized. One guy from the crew of three was sitting on the roof balancing the boat. I don't usually wear my heart on my sleeve, but it was hands down the scariest trip in my life and it was difficult to pull myself together. My heart was in my mouth. Finally, at the very end of our journey our boat collided with one of the boat moored at the shore because we had our lights turned off as it was an illegal transfer. The redeeming feature of that trip was the amazing atmosphere on the island. It was like I died and came round in heaven.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,840 mod
    "I don't usually wear my heart on my sleeve, but it was hands down the scariest trip in my life and it was difficult to pull myself together." What a very nice phrase @Vok. And what an adventure.

    I crossed the river from Senegal to The Gambia one evening, in the pitch dark, in what I hadn't bargained for as a 'ferry' which was a sizable wooden open boat with maybe a couple of dozen people packed in. Fortunately it was fairly calm but it wasn't what I expected when I caught a local bus to return back to Banjul, capital of The Gambia.
  • VokVok Posts: 310 ✭✭
    What happened @mheredge ? Was it a treacherous path or a reckless driver out there in Gambia?
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,840 mod
    It was just a bit scary being out in an open boat in the pitch dark @Vok. Although it was just a river, it was close to the sea so quite a wide river with waves!

    I have a long list of dangerous roads, too long to mention!
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 30,268 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    It never happened to me but there was one incident happened of bike car crash infront of our car. It was a terrible scene where bike rider died due to head injury as he wasn't wearing helmet. I couldn't come out of that traumatic scene for a week.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,840 mod
    That must have been terrible to see @Bubbly. I have seen the aftermath of a few very nasty pile ups, but thankfully have never seen any of the casualties.
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 30,268 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Besides that, horrific earthquake of 8.1 magnitude back in 2005 is still in my memories. When more than half million people lost their lives. I went to the devastated areas along with a rescue team. There were corpses on the road sides that left a deep fear in my mind. I am scared of earthquake, even if it is mild. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,840 mod
    That must have been a journey form hell even if you were not scared or in danger yourself @Bubbly. Luckily I wasn't in Nepal when they had the earthquake in 2015.
  • VokVok Posts: 310 ✭✭
    That's an appalling tragedy @Bubbly . I can't watch those videos of people being engulfed by a huge wave without tears welled up in my eyes.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,367 mod
    I remember breaking down on holiday once, and we were 6 hours away from our home and had to be towed back. That was an uncomfortable journey, as all of my family were in the back of a tow truck.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,840 mod
    I remember being in a friend's car that broke down late one Friday evening in the middle of nowhere in north Wales. We all had to sleep in the car because the AA wouldn't come out till the morning. We were on our way to a hiking weekend with friends and we had the breakfast food in our car, so when we eventually rolled up past 10am, we were not popular.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,367 mod
    mheredge said:

    I remember being in a friend's car that broke down late one Friday evening in the middle of nowhere in north Wales. We all had to sleep in the car because the AA wouldn't come out till the morning. We were on our way to a hiking weekend with friends and we had the breakfast food in our car, so when we eventually rolled up past 10am, we were not popular.

    ..well at least you had some food! I don't think I would care that I was unpopular, as I bet your friends had a more comfortable night than you did!
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,840 mod
    True, but they weren't impressed at having to go to find breakfast as normally we brought everything with us, self catering in the mountain hut where we stayed.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,367 mod
    mheredge said:

    True, but they weren't impressed at having to go to find breakfast as normally we brought everything with us, self catering in the mountain hut where we stayed.

    Ah right well if it was a mountain hut then I imagine it might have been quite difficult to find some other food then!
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 786 ✭✭✭
    edited January 25
    > @GemmaRowlands said:
    > True, but they weren't impressed at having to go to find breakfast as normally we brought everything with us, self catering in the mountain hut where we stayed.
    >
    > Ah right well if it was a mountain hut then I imagine it might have been quite difficult to find some other food then!
    I have no idea but can one really call a place in Wales a 'middle of nowhere'? My guess is that the mountain had a village with a BB on the other slope.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 786 ✭✭✭
    My worst situation was I guess when my car spinned three or four rotations on icy road. Luckily it was at night, so the road was empty and another luck was that the car didn't turn over. Frankly, I was driving too fast for those conditions: ice crust, friable snow, night, no lighting, I was quite a fresh driver at that time.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 786 ✭✭✭
    I can remember also from my cycling experience:
    - once a small lorry started changing lanes without seeing me at first. I started wearing a visibility jest after that.
    - once a bus scared me into changing to the unpaved shoulder by driving too close (I wasn't cycling in the middle of the lane).
    Anyway, cycling on a one lane country road where cars and trucks are making 60 mph is risky enough.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,840 mod
    I took a corner too fast on a wet road in my Mini once @Practical_Severard and skidded into a stone wall. I was okay but when I saw steam coming from under the bonnet and I couldn't open the door, I panicked and leaped out of the side window. It's amazing how agile you can be with a bit of adrenaline. Sadly the Mini was a right off.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 786 ✭✭✭
    edited January 26
    > @mheredge said:
    > I took a corner too fast on a wet road in my Mini once @Practical_Severard and skidded into a stone wall. I was okay but when I saw steam coming from under the bonnet and I couldn't open the door, I panicked and leaped out of the side window. It's amazing how agile you can be with a bit of adrenaline. Sadly the Mini was a right off.

    I guess any still living driver can remember something like this. People tend to learn on their own mistakes rather than someone else's tales. Was the passenger's door jammed too?
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,840 mod
    I'm not sure if I even thought to try @Practical_Severard. I was amazed at how quickly I made it out of the window. I would have thought that I was far too big to get through so easily.

    The second Mini I had was also written off, but it wasn't my fault this time, nor do I remember anything as I was knocked out for a day after a woman in her Mercedes who was driving on the wrong side of the road hit me head on. She was German and had just come over on the ferry from France and had forgotten about driving on the other side of the road in Britain.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 786 ✭✭✭
    edited January 29
    > @mheredge said:
    > I'm not sure if I even thought to try @Practical_Severard. I was amazed at how quickly I made it out of the window. I would have thought that I was far too big to get through so easily.

    Yes. A person has wonderful hidden abilities which are usually triggered by the survival instinct, in the first place.

    >
    > The second Mini I had was also written off, but it wasn't my fault this time, nor do I remember anything as I was knocked out for a day after a woman in her Mercedes who was driving on the wrong side of the road hit me head on. She was German and had just come over on the ferry from France and had forgotten about driving on the other side of the road in Britain.

    That was the most dangerous type of car accident, the heads-on collision. Most traffic deaths come of this. Moreover, I believe, your accident happened before the EuroNCAP tests were introduced, so the Mini would have unlikely scored many stars.

    This Sunday I gave a lift to my sporting clays coach because his car had been badly damaged in an accident. It was almost a heads-on, he managed to spin the steering wheel enough to make it a side contact. Though the cars couldn't move, and their side bodies would require much work. The incoming car had the headlights off and that was at night on a narrow country road. The coach's foot was clamped by a pedal and the other driver had her arm broken. It's a shame that the local punishment for driving with lights off is a small fine only.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,367 mod

    > @GemmaRowlands said:

    > True, but they weren't impressed at having to go to find breakfast as normally we brought everything with us, self catering in the mountain hut where we stayed.

    >

    > Ah right well if it was a mountain hut then I imagine it might have been quite difficult to find some other food then!

    I have no idea but can one really call a place in Wales a 'middle of nowhere'? My guess is that the mountain had a village with a BB on the other slope.

    There are many places in Wales that could be considered the middle of nowhere. There is a lot of countryside without anything else for miles.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,840 mod
    @Practical_Severard my mother forbade me to drive a Mini after the second accident. I progressed to a Peugeot 205 but omitted to tell her that in terms of safety, it was just as bad. These were the days when cars didn't all come fitted with airbags.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 786 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > @Practical_Severard my mother forbade me to drive a Mini after the second accident. I progressed to a Peugeot 205 but omitted to tell her that in terms of safety, it was just as bad. These were the days when cars didn't all come fitted with airbags.

    Well, the Peugeot 205 looks like a longer and a heavier car what make it safer.
    A longer bonnet means more metal to absorb heads-on collision shock by deforming and the law of momentum conservation hasn't been revoked yet, so, the heavier the car, the smaller is the hit acceleration.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,840 mod
    @Practical_Severard according to Which? magazine the Peugeot 205 (back then at least) ranked alongside the Mini I think as much because even though it had a slightly longer bonnet, it was pretty light and flimsy. I think car safety has improved a lot since the 1990s however so I have no idea now how they would compare.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,367 mod
    mheredge said:

    @Practical_Severard my mother forbade me to drive a Mini after the second accident. I progressed to a Peugeot 205 but omitted to tell her that in terms of safety, it was just as bad. These were the days when cars didn't all come fitted with airbags.

    Cars are much safer than they used to be. And there are so many detailed safety statistics available now that it is quite easy to choose a car based on its safety if you want to.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,840 mod
    I was surprised to find the tourist bus I travelled on to Pokhara last Saturday had no safety belts at all (maybe the driver had one, but I'm willing to bet he didn't wear it).
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