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"The April rain, the April rain,
Comes slanting down in fitful showers,
Then from the furrow shoots the grain,
And banks are fledged with nestling flowers;
And in grey shawl and woodland bowers
The cuckoo through the April rain
Calls once again."

Mathilde Blind, April Rain
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Should every university subject enroll euqal proportions of males and females?

lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
In my opinion, men and women should have the same educational opportunities. However, I do not agree with the idea of accepting the equal proportions of each gender in every university subject.

Having the same numbers of males and females on all degree courses is simply unrealistic. Student numbers on any course depend on the applications that the institution receives. If a university decided to fill courses with equal proportions of males and females,
it would need enough applicants. In reality, many courses are more popular with one gender than the other, and it would not be practical to aim for equal proportions. For example, nursing course tend to attract more female applicants, and it would be difficult to fill these courses if fifty percent of the places needed to go to males.

Apart from the practical concerns expressed above, I also believe it would be unfair to base admission to univeristy courses on gender. Universities should continue to select the best candidates for each course accroding to their qualifications. In this way, men and women have the same opportunities, and the applicants know that they will be successful if they work hard to achieve good grades at school. If a female student is the best candidate for a place on a course, it is surely wrong to reject her in favor of a male student with lower grades or fewer qualifications.

In conclusion, the selection of university students should be based on merit, and it would be both impractical and unfair to change to a selection of university procedure based on gender.
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Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    I think that some allowance in some places should be made to make sure that women are encouraged to go to university @lisa. In the UK I remember that there was a drop in numbers of women going to university for some reason, but now it is the opposite.

    https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/may/12/university-gender-gap-scandal-thinktank-men


  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    There were equal proportions of male and female in my class when I was in the jounior middle school, but few of us continued our senior middle school education. In my opinion, I do not support the idea in the article you posted, it is unfair to female students. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    It's the traditional views that a woman's place is in the home that is still a big barrier to women going to university in many countries @lisa. This is why in some places I think it is important to help make it easier for girls so that this old fashioned view can be forgotten.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    My husband's hometown is still in this condition, his mother and sisters do not go to work and most of time stay at home to do some housework. For me, I can not accept this kind of life, and for them, they can not understand why I choose to work abroad instead of staying at home to take care of olders and child. In my view, they live hard without their husbands, my father-in-law does everything which is needed to be outside, such as expense, vegetables, cars and so on. Menial tasks belong to women, in their view, which is the most unaccepted idea for me. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    This is how the world is changing everywhere @lisa but unless women recognise that they can lead their own lives and don't have to be tied to the kitchen sink, then things won't change for them.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    There is one sentence once I wrote in my notebook, which is from one article: Women, with few pretensions, were unwilling to learn.

    In my opinion, women should or must go to university to take a higher education, as I learned from the university, maybe a woman could not find a good job after taking a higher education, but she surely could not find a good job without taking a higher education. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    In some societies I'm not sure if it's because women are unwilling as much as discouraged to continue their education @lisa. I have some friends in Nepal who managed to get a good education but are now very frustrated house wives as they are expected to just stay at home and take care of the family. In other countries, employers don't help either, making it difficult for women in good jobs to return to work after starting a family. As long as women see their role as having children, this can be a barrier to achieving a better education to improve job prospects in some places.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Mentioned job discrimination, there is a joke in China, the women, who do not get married or are widows, are easily sucessful compared with those who have husbands. @mheredge We only have three months as a holiday when we are pregnant and most of us have to work until the last month of giving birth to the babies. After giving birth to babies, we can not have a rest, then we must start to work or the employers will be unhappy with us. Fortunately, our company gives us one year as a holiday, but it is true that there are just few female supervisors in our company. The situation of our company is not unique in China, most companies do not want to hire female empolyees who have been married but do not have any babies.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    Interestingly Theresa May's career success by the China press recently reporting on her visit to China, was put down to the fact she and her husband don't have any children. This is very unfair as I know quite a lot of very successful women who have children.

    However the discrimination you mention is sometimes still a problem in some areas of work @lisa.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    I am familiar with the stories of Mrs Thatcher and Queen Elizabeth II, and Mrs Thatcher has many children if I remembered clearly. Compared with UK, there are not any female presidents in China until now, there was one Queen in Tang dynasty, but she was critized or even described as a monster. Chinese society is not fair for females, I have to admit that although I am reluctant to. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    Mrs Thatcher had a son and a daughter @lisa. They called her the Iron Lady and she was not particularly sympathetic to women's rights.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    She is famous in China as her nickname-Iron Lady. And I agree that she was sucessful becuase she was prime minister as well as a mother, she could handle these two difficult jobs together, and she is absloutely a great woman although she was not particularly sympathetic to women's rights. :p @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    I'm not sure if she was a role model mother @lisa and her son wasn't the best behaved from what I remember.

    I think all the women I have known who were very successful just worked twice as hard as their male colleagues and usually had very supportive husbands.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    There is one slang in China : One supportive wife stands behind her sucessful husband, and I think it also works for a sucessful woman. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    They say behind every successful man there is a woman @lisa, but I am not convinced that this applies the other way round.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Actually it is invented by me, behind every sucessful woman there is a man. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    I have to beg to differ @lisa!
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    In fact, the numbers of female politicans in Europea are much more than those in China, there are few female politicans in China, and there are not any female presidents or secretaries until now in China, but there were some vice secretaries. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    Although in Nepal they said that at least a third of the parliamentary representatives should be female, there are very few in any senior positions @lisa.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    In most Asian governments there are not enough female representatives, although they always announce that female should be equal with male. There is a joke in China, there are lots of delegates in the government, but they do not know us and we do not know them, either, what is worse, we are told that they represent us to do some important decisions, which is ridiculous. They do not know us at all, how they represent us or what kind of decisions they could do for us? @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    I think that this is a problem in most countries @lisa. Like my friend said when he was elected as a member of the parliament in Nepal said when I worried this role might take him away from his job directing a small hospital, 'I don't think so.' A couple of years later I asked him how much time he had been required to spend in Kathmandu and he said he had been only asked to attend two meetings there. So much for listening to elected representatives of the people!
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    edited February 18
    It is hard for most Asian countries, people do not know their representatives and the elected representatives do not know their people either. How they can post necessary opinions for people? @mheredge As far as I know, our representatives are richers or politicans, I really do not think they can understand the hardship of local people, such as housing problems, medical ones, and so on.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    I've just read that in the UK they might be reducing the tuition fees for humanities courses at university. I hope that this might make it easier for students to afford higher education. Recently yhe fees went up to £9000/year so before looking at living expenses, students have to borrow £27000 for a typical three years bachelor's course.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Wow, 9000 pounds per year is very expensive, and that will be a hard burden for the students and their families. The tuition fees are much more expensive than Chinese ones, although Chinese tuition fees are lower than Brithish ones, there are still lots of students can not afford their four years' expenses. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    I agree @lisa, it's very expensive but it's much worse for foreign students wanting to study in the UK. I don't know exactly how much more they have to pay but it is a lot more.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    It is very expensive for a foreign student studying in the UK, if I remembered clearly, the expense per year including tution fee and expenditure of life is about 400 000 to 500 000 RMB, and according to the exchange rate of today, I mean from the bank of China, the expense per year is about 46000 pounds to 56000 pounds. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    Ouch @lisa. Only the very richest can afford to study in the UK. Not only are the fees high, but it is an expensive place to live too.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    edited February 25
    Once I had a dream to study abroad, but my parents could not affrod the expensive tution fees, in fact, they have had tried their best to supply supports to me, and the tution fees of universities in China are expensive, too. Although there is only 570 pounds as the tution fee per year for a student in my university, the living cost is more than 570 pounds nowadays, fortunately, there are more ways to earn money now compared with the time in which I was in the university. @mheredge At that time, it was hard to find a job to earn money although my parents worked very hard.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    This is why I am so opposed to high tuition fees for students @lisa. In Slovenia, higher education is free, even to foreign students.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    It is a pity that almost all of top universities of the whole world ask high tution fees or at least high expense of life the students or their familes have to deal with. Tution fees, in some aspect, are one of the factors which sabotage the development of society. Numerous people have to give up their dreams because of financial troubles, and choose another way to feed themselves, maybe one of them is potential painter, chemist, or the one who has chance to be rewarded Nobel prize. @mheredge
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