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Words and phrases that I had to look up in the dictionary before using them

takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,516 ✭✭✭✭
Write down words and phrases that you had to look up in the dictionary before you used them.
The list you make here can work as a reminder. You can come back from time to time later on and see what words and phrases gave you trouble in the past.

Comments

  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,516 ✭✭✭✭
    multitasker

    I knew the word “multitask”, but today I learned that you can use it like “multitasker” for someone who can juggle things quite well.
  • asifbappyasifbappy Posts: 19 ✭✭
    Goes ballistic
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,516 ✭✭✭✭
    front desk
    This is the place at a hotel where receptionists are.

    In Japanese, we simply call it “front”, without “desk”, but if you say “front of the hotel” in English, people will take you outside the entrance of the hotel, right?
  • FarmduckFarmduck Posts: 45 ✭✭
    @takafromtokyo Yes, the cars arrive at the front of the hotel. The reception or front desk is located in the lobby. A lobby is generally the first entrance room in a building - but not usually a house. When you enter a lobby, you usually find the reception, the tenant directory and the lifts (or elevators.)

    An interesting development of the meaning of lobby is in the political sense. When people wanted to push their case to politicians, they would wait in the lobby of Parliament or Congress for the politicians to walk by so they could talk to them. Now, a "lobby group" is a group of people who attempt to influence politicians: the environmental lobby or the oil industry lobby. People who do this work are called lobbyists because they lobby politicians.

    So, in less than 100 years, that word has taken on a whole new meaning, an extra noun (lobbyists) and a verb form.
  • wtdarkwtdark Posts: 5
    TO BE HAD

    I want to write a little more because It's a good way for practicing writing. And I hope to get corrected if there's anything wrong in grammar. I might ask too much, sorry.

    I learned this phrase from a book I recently read. The original sentence is "What happens when
    we’ve gained everything TO BE HAD from fine-tuning the old lines of business that we’ve inherited?" At the time, I can not even read it in a meaningful way, now I understand it means "what' s the next if we've gained everything THERE from fine-tuning the old way of making money in the business that we've inherited?" (seems I've made it more difficult to understand)

    and the explanation I found on the internet says -- When what is to be had is a thing, not a person, "to be had"means "available."

    example as below :
    -- Rings are to be had at a jewelry store.
    -- Used clothing is to be had at a flea market.

    It took me more than half an hour to write, and most of them are copying things. Shame.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 719 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2017
    > @wtdark said:
    >
    I hadn't come across 'to be had' until I read your post, @wtdark . So I googled it in quotes, "to be had" and I've found out it was a phrase:

    https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/to-be-had

    to be had
    phrase
    If you have been had, someone has tricked you, for example by selling you something at too high a price.
    [informal]
    If your customer thinks he's been had, you have to make him happy.

    So the meaning of the sentence is completely different, since the meaning of the phrase isn't the direct combination of the meanings of the words it consists of. It's rather like:
    "What happens when we’ve gained everything TO BE TRICKED/FOOLED from fine-tuning the old lines of business that we’ve inherited?"
  • wtdarkwtdark Posts: 5
    thank you @Practical_Severard, "to be had" do have two meanings.

    1. when the subject to the phrase is a person, it is "being fooled".
    2. when the subject to the phrase is a thing, it means "something there you can get"

    Here's a link for your reference , en.wiktionary.org/wiki/be_had (for a weird reason I can not post a link here, damn it)

    As to my example sentence, the article is talking about being creative. If not, we will end up in an dead-end, as there is no new paths to go.

    That's why the question come up, "What happens when we’ve gained everything to be had from fine-tuning the old lines of business that we’ve inherited?" --- what left there for us to do, nothing. Life is boring.

    That's my understanding.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 719 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2017
    > @wtdark said:
    >
    You've been right, I stand corrected.

    > what left there for us to do, nothing.
    Probably, we could make a step forward instead.

    Posting a link really requires a advanced user rank here, but a plain-text link is OK, copying and pasting isn't anything difficult.
  • wtdarkwtdark Posts: 5
    AGREED UPON

    Synonyms is stipulatory --- constituted or contracted by stipulation or agreement.

    Honestly, I don't know what it means.

    And the sentence is "It’s intellectually difficult because the knowledge that everyone is taught in school is by definition agreed upon."

    can anyone help me?
  • filauziofilauzio Posts: 1,664 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I came across this phrase: ' to burn on your savings '.

    It read within an article dealing with persons who couldn't afford leaving their job in order to take another better-paying one.
    The reason was that in their signed contract with the present company there was included a non-compete clause.
    It meant they couldn't resign and join a rival company.
    Therefore, if they happened to quit the previous company, they had to search a new job in a different field, meanwhile living off unemployment's subsidy.
    Whenever running out of it, then, they were forced ' to burn on their savings '.

    I guess its meaning corresponds to ' draw on savings '.

    I believe here a metaphor plays its role: the one of fuel ( savings ) being burnt to give power ( energy to live ).
    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,193 mod
    You burn through your savings but I haven't come across burning on your savings. But you do do draw on your savings. You make a withdrawal from your account or draw on your account @filauzio.
  • filauziofilauzio Posts: 1,664 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I've got it @mheredge. I looked up the word ' through ' and came across the use of it in such phrases as get/go/run through sth, meaning use something quickly.
    Then maybe by saying ' burn on savings ' you imply using quickly them as well; I couldn't think of a verb which brings the idea of using up anything more quickly than to burn.

    Thank you for your correction, I've literally burnt on your help. :D
    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,193 mod
    You can burn with ambition or desire too @filauzio but I'm not sure if my help can burn you.
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