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"The April rain, the April rain,
Comes slanting down in fitful showers,
Then from the furrow shoots the grain,
And banks are fledged with nestling flowers;
And in grey shawl and woodland bowers
The cuckoo through the April rain
Calls once again."

Mathilde Blind, April Rain
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Should the teenagers be forced to do unpaid work in their spare time?

lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
Many young people work on a volunteer basis, and this can only be beneficial for both the individual and society as a whole. However, I do not agree that we should therefore force all teenagers to do unpaid work.

Teenagers are already under enough pressure with their studies, without being given the added responsibility of work in their spare time. School is just as demanding as a full-time job, and teachers expect their students to do homework and exam revision on top of lessons every day. When young people do have some free time, we should encourage them to enjoy it with their friends or spend it doing sports or other lesure activities. They have many years of work ahead of them when they finish their studies.

At the same time, I do not believe that society has anything to gain from obliging young people to do unpaid work. In fact, I would argue that it goes against the values of a free and fair society to force a group of people to do something against their will. Doing this could only lead to resentment amongst young people, who would feel that they were being used, and parents, who would not want to be told how to raise their children. Currently, nobody is forced to volunteer, and this is the best system.

In conclusion, teengagers may choose to work for free and help others, and I do not agree that we should make this compulsory.

Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    I don't think anyone should be forced to do anything @lisa but certainly teenagers should be encouraged to volunteer. In Nepal it is very normal for young adults, before they settle down and once they've finished their studies to work for a year or so as 'volunteers' maybe unpaid or paid a nominal amount. They see it as their duty to help their community.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    @mheredge And I think they can gain working experiences from woking on a volunteer basis.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    Not only that @lisa, but it demonstrates to prospective employers their willingness to work.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    I think they can get lots of experiences realted to work and society
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    It gives them the experience of a working environment but most of all, by helping others, I think this helps them realize how well off they are compared to some people @lisa. Hopefully it can help make them into more caring and considerate individuals.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Mentioned working experience, do you agree that univeristy students should do some part-time jobs? Or they must do some part-time jobs? It seemd few students did part-time jobs when I was in the university, we did want to get a part-time job, but it seemed a bit difficult and the school did not provide much help at that time. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    Some students have to get part time work just to finance their studies @lisa, which is not an ideal state of affairs. Placements that are a part of the degree however, are quite different and are relevant to the degree.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Happiness seems to be same to everyone, but hardness have kinds of types. Life is tough in the whole world @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    I think it is tougher for youngsters these days in Britain @lisa.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Life is tougher for ours, I am one of 80s, and we have to work hard, because most of our bi-parents rely on us, and we have to pay the housing and car loans, children education and our social insurances at the same time. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    Youngsters in the UK don't have quite as much burden looking after their parents @lisa because the government offers some degree of help for health and old people's homes. However this is diminishing and increasingly it is proving inadequate.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Once I read an article written by a Chinese who was living or studying in Canada, she said the health care run by the goverment is difficult to ask for a bed and people have to wait for a long time for their applications. @mheredge And the private health cares are very expensive.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    Canada has a good health care system and Americans are very jealous @lisa. I have even heard of marriages of convenience where an American marries a Canadian just to benefit from their health care system!
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    edited February 25
    Haha, it is the same as a Chinese girl gets married with an American boy to get her green card. Both of them want to benefit from other countries' welfare. @mheredge That is truely a short way to get all the benefits, we have to admit.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    Immigration are well aware of this @lisa and check up to make sure that the couple really are married properly, sleeping in the same bed, living in the same apartment and so on.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    Maybe they share the same bed but do not touch each other at all. There is a film to show this when I was young to watch it, but I can not remember the name. Fortunately they felt in love with each other at last but the man was deported. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    There's a well known film with Gerard Depardieu who marries an American girl to get his Green Card @lisa.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    I googled him, he is an actor and now a Russian, but he was a French, or maybe a citizen of America. Artist is a bit to be understood, as we know. @mheredge Do you know Wendi Deng, maybe her former name is familiar to you, that is Wendi Deng Murdoch. Her first alleged marriage is about getting her Green card, according to the gossip, in order to get her Green card, she got married with an old American guy, then she got a divorce with him after she got the qualification of Green card. Then you know the following story, she got married with her ex-husband Murdoch and successfully gave birth of two daughters, but Mr. Murdoch got a divorce with her at last.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    I read that a Russian oligarch recently paid the Cypriot government for a Cypriot passport to have an EU passport @lisa. People with money can usually get whatever they want.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    edited March 7
    Cypriot is not one of members of EU? Rich people can get whatever they want, and they are elegant and happy everyday, Last night I read a comment about "Tamara's life", her father is the former chief executive of the Formula One Group, her husband is a richer, too, and her husband said "she is awalys charming, kind and sociable, and she is happy everyday." Why she is not happy? She is rich, she does not need to do any domestic chores, the only thing she needs to concern is which clothes I should wear today, I think. @mheredge Can money buy happiness? Yes, it definitely can!
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    I'm not convinced that money can really buy happiness @lisa. I'm not saying rich people are unhappy, but I think there are a lot of wealthy people who are unhappy for all sorts of reasons, even if it is not because they are short of money. Some of course, are unhappy because they never think they have enough.
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    But we have to admit that money can bring the sense of security for us, there is one slang in China "money is not omnipotent, but without money anything is impossible" , no one wants to admit that he/she has enough money, even the richest man in the world. But most of them want to donate most of their wealth to charity as far as I know. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    This is very true, and many people are very unhappy because of the lack of enough money to live on, as well as those who are not happy because they can never get enough @lisa.

    Bill Gates gives away a large amount of his fortune to charity, but then again, he is the richest man in the world!
  • lisalisa Posts: 1,190 ✭✭✭
    In fact most of common people are living at subsistence levels instead of enoughness ones, as President Trump said, every leader is fighting for his own country or nation, every common people is struggling for himself or his own families to have a better life. Bill Gates is unique, so most of us feel that our money is not enough at all. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    Atlanta in the USA was reported a few days ago as having poverty worse than many poorest countries in the world @lisa.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/dec/15/extreme-poverty-america-un-special-monitor-report

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/24/opinion/poverty-united-states.html

    I know I would rather be poor in a poor country than in a rich country. It seems that the UN is starting to measure just this factor.
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