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There is wind where the rose was,
Cold rain where sweet grass was,
And clouds like sheep
Stream o'er the steep
Grey skies where the lark was.

Nought warm where your hand was,
Nought gold where your hair was,
But phantom, forlorn,
Beneath the thorn,
Your ghost where your face was.

Cold wind where your voice was,
Tears, tears where my heart was,
And ever with me,
Child, ever with me,
Silence where hope was.

November by Walter de la Mare
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The new middle class holiday trend - paying to WORK

Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 605 ✭✭✭
edited October 23 in Work and Money
The new middle class holiday trend - paying to WORK: LIZ HOGGARD joins office workers yearning to 'de-stress' by shelling out £45 to spend two hours picking grapes alongside real low-paid labourers

(This is an excerpt from
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-5006441/The-new-middle-class-holiday-trend-paying-work.html#ixzz4wJhwf48M )

My name is Liz. I like shops, restaurants and taxis. The countryside makes me nervous — it’s too green and quiet. So the idea of spending a day off picking grapes in a West Sussex vineyard in October is my idea of hell.

But here I am, standing in a damp field near Chichester, clutching a pair of pruners on a ‘harvest experience’ day organised by the Tinwood Estate. Even more bizzare: I’m paying for the privilege. For £45, you can now toil all morning picking chardonnay, pinot noir and pinot meunier grapes, with a break for a ‘three-course rustic harvest lunch’.

[...]

UK farms and vineyards are marketing these ‘working holidays’ as a chance for people to reconnect with the countryside and enjoy the camaraderie of farm life. An honest day’s work on the farm helps to recharge the batteries, apparently. People report that working in the fresh air all day helps them de-stress and sleep better. They learn new skills and make new friends.

[...]
Mark Driver, co-founder of Rathfinny, says the work is hard but fun and everyone has to spend all day in the fields come rain or shine.

‘If you work behind a desk, I think picking grapes is very therapeutic. People enjoy being outside and working.’ You’re treated well and given generous breaks, and carrying baskets of grapes all week means you get quite fit and sleep like a log. In the evenings, workers walk to the pub or play board games in the living room with its cosy woodburner and big sofas.

It reminds me of the classical children's book of "The adventures of Tom Sawyer":

"Work consists of whatever a body is obliged to do, and that Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do. [...] There are wealthy gentlemen in England who drive four-horse passenger-coaches twenty or thirty miles on a daily line, in the summer, because the privilege costs them considerable money; but if they were offered wages for the service, that would turn it into work and then they would resign. "

(Chapter II, "Whitewashing the Fence"). Really, there's nothing new under the sun!

Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,081 mod
    Volunteers pay to volunteer all the time. It's a big business.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 605 ✭✭✭
    Here large agricultural companies sometimes invite people to pick berries, @mheredge . Everyone can come and some people do it for fun. You receive one or two crates out of ten you bring, it's usually like this.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,081 mod
    I know that often fruit farms in the UK allow people to come and pick what they want @Practical_Severard and then they pay for what they have picked. The method you suggest is a good idea as that way the farmers gain by not paying people to pick the fruit while at the same time people can have fun and take home some of the fruit they have picked.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 605 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > I know that often fruit farms in the UK allow people to come and pick what they want @Practical_Severard and then they pay for what they have picked. The method you suggest is a good idea as that way the farmers gain by not paying people to pick the fruit while at the same time people can have fun and take home some of the fruit they have picked.

    Would Brits want to get several crates of fruit for their work? While in Russia there's a tradition to stock fruit and vegs for winter, I'm not sure that the subjects to Her Majesty are used to this.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,081 mod
    Not in large quantities for the winter @Practical_Severard but in the summer, picking fruit like strawberries is quite popular.
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