Hello.

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

By all these lovely tokens
September days are here,
With summer’s best of weather
And autumn’s best of cheer.

Helen Hunt Jackson - September
The breezes taste
Of apple peel.
The air is full
Of smells to feel-
Ripe fruit, old footballs,
Burning brush,
New books, erasers,
Chalk, and such.
The bee, his hive,
Well-honeyed hum,
And Mother cuts
Chrysanthemums.
Like plates washed clean
With suds, the days
Are polished with
A morning haze.

John Updike, September
Don't forget to check the calendar(s) for session times. Sessions are held on different platforms, so be sure to find out where the session will take place:-

Speaking Practice

LEN English sessions:-
http://www.learnenglish.de/calendar/learnenglishcalendar.html

Listening Practice 24/7

English radio playlists:-
http://www.englishradio.be/musicevents/calendar.html

Terribly British

mheredgemheredge TeacherHere and therePosts: 26,992 mod
I had to laugh at this latest British Airways safety film. It is so, so British.



The Brits are very good at laughing at themselves too. TV series like Fawlty Towers are real classics.

Comments

  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 5,307 mod
    We have to laugh at ourselves.. otherwise everyone else will just do it for us! I am proud of being British, but I will admit that some of the things we insist on doing really are quite funny.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 26,992 mod
    British humour is unique @GemmaRowlands. It's a bit like believing a cup of tea is the answer to everything (which of course, it is).
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 737 OTT
    http://jackelliot.over-blog.com/2017/03/britishness.what-does-it-now-mean.html

    So that is what it means to be British ..... Thanks @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 26,992 mod
    Things you should never say to a Brit:

    https://www.indy100.com/article/things-should-never-say-british-person-7870521

    National passtime:


  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 26,992 mod
    But the worst thing here is that the flag is upside down!


  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 487 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > Things you should never say to a Brit:
    >
    > https://www.indy100.com/article/things-should-never-say-british-person-7870521
    >
    > National passtime:

    1. I guess that beans on a toast are great after a morning cross-country gallop what every Brit does as morning exercise and

    2. What's wrong with drinking much tea? We support Brits in this!
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 5,307 mod

    > @mheredge said:

    > Things you should never say to a Brit:

    >

    > https://www.indy100.com/article/things-should-never-say-british-person-7870521

    >

    > National passtime:



    1. I guess that beans on a toast are great after a morning cross-country gallop what every Brit does as morning exercise and



    2. What's wrong with drinking much tea? We support Brits in this!

    Absolutely nothing is wrong with drinking so much tea! It is a wonderful beverage, and I strongly believe that the world would be a better place if only people would drink more tea!
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 487 ✭✭✭
    > @GemmaRowlands said:
    > Absolutely nothing is wrong with drinking so much tea! It is a wonderful beverage, and I strongly believe that the world would be a better place if only people would drink more tea!

    Russians often finish every meal with a cup of tea, and it doesn't mean that we don't have tea between meals. I know many people would find it odd.

    Second-class cars of the Russian sleeping trains traditionally have boilers where every passenger can fill a cup round the clock.

    My brother worked once for a Turkish company as a construction worker. The company provided free lunch in a canteen, but tea was changed to still water. He found it weird.

    The most favourable sort is the black tea, but, unlike in Britain, fewer people add milk to it. Though, nowdays many people have started drinking green tea, as it's praised in the press a healthy beverage.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 26,992 mod
    Green tea is a very healthy beverage @Practical_Severard. It contains folate, manganese, some iron, potassium and copper which are all important for a healthy body.

    Black tea also has these things, though less folate but a cup contains around 30% of our daily requirement for manganese which is important for antioxidant and enzyme function. Folate is a vitamin B needed to make DNA and other genetic material and necessary for the body’s cells to divide.

    Milk is often added to black tea and even just a tablespoon of half fat milk provides some calcium and vitamin B12, another very important nutrient that helps keep the body's nerve and blood cells healthy. Vitamin B12 also helps prevent a type of anemia that makes people tired and weak.

    So tea drinking is actually very healthy. I can't get enough of the stuff black or green.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 487 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > Green tea is a very healthy beverage...

    One can say this about any kind of food or beverage. At the same time anything can be abused. Does anyone in the UK use tea to get caffeine high, like the Russian prisoners do?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chifir'

    It like brewing half-pound of black tea in 6 pints of water.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 26,992 mod
    There isn't so much caffeine in tea to give such a high @Practical_Severard. I'm not sure the human body could drink enough to get much of a buzz from PG Tips.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 487 ✭✭✭
    edited August 17
    > @mheredge said:
    > There isn't so much caffeine in tea to give such a high @Practical_Severard. I'm not sure the human body could drink enough to get much of a buzz from PG Tips.

    I think that's not a problem @mheredge . All one needs is just to brew 64 PG Tips bags at once. Unless they're decaffeinated, of course.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 5,307 mod

    > @GemmaRowlands said:

    > Absolutely nothing is wrong with drinking so much tea! It is a wonderful beverage, and I strongly believe that the world would be a better place if only people would drink more tea!



    Russians often finish every meal with a cup of tea, and it doesn't mean that we don't have tea between meals. I know many people would find it odd.



    Second-class cars of the Russian sleeping trains traditionally have boilers where every passenger can fill a cup round the clock.



    My brother worked once for a Turkish company as a construction worker. The company provided free lunch in a canteen, but tea was changed to still water. He found it weird.



    The most favourable sort is the black tea, but, unlike in Britain, fewer people add milk to it. Though, nowdays many people have started drinking green tea, as it's praised in the press a healthy beverage.

    I just can't drink black tea. It tastes too strong to me. The milk helps to lessen the flavour a little bit, and I like that.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 26,992 mod
    Ugh, brewing up with 64 PG Tips teabags in one go? I have a friend who literally just shows the teabag to the hot water. I reckon I can get two decent strength cups from one teabag.

    In my search for Morecambe's treatment of teabags @Practical_Severard (in which I failed), I was reminded at how terribly British and hilarious Morecambe and Wise are.

    This gives a taster

    And nothing whatsoever to do with tea, this sketch had me laughing (I'm old enough to just remember it the first time round).

  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 487 ✭✭✭
    edited August 22
    > @mheredge said:
    > Ugh, brewing up with 64 PG Tips teabags in one go?
    Well, it's done for special needs, which common people seldom have.

    >I have a friend who literally just shows the teabag to the hot water. I reckon I can get two decent strength cups from one teabag.
    The both are too weak infusions to my liking. One needs to have enough tea to unveil it's full flavour. The traditional rate 'one teaspoonful for each drinker and one for the teapot' is just right. Of course, some people can't drink it due to gastroenterological issues, like my mother-in-law.

    And if we're for flavour then any tea-bags aren't good. Makers stuff them woth the worst tea leaves. Those bags are good for lunch-breaks, construction sites ans so on, but not for home. For a family tea-drinking, and moreover, for the Britain's traditional five-o'clock party, only loose-leafe teas fit and a procedure like in the video, ensuring that you have tasty water, and a china teapot is what's requiered:


    But I'd add few things to this method:
    - warming the cups, not only the teapot
    - pouring a cup of tea back into the teapot before serving for the film found on the water surface to to be blended with the rest of water. Here's a video how it's done: (fast forward to 4:59 if the video starts from the beginning)


    To be continued.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 26,992 mod
    You're a purist! I'm afraid I just chuck the teabag into my cup and pour boiling water over it. I usually put the milk in first, but nowadays have been known to add it after.

    I tend not to brew a pot of tea but that's maybe more because normally I'm just making a cup for one. A teapot is much better when making tea for several people. And then I might use loose tea rather than bags @Practical_Severard.

    I'm planning to bring back a lot of tea from Nepal as this is excellent - like Darjeeling tea but even better!
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 487 ✭✭✭
    edited August 23
    > @mheredge said:
    In my search for Morecambe's treatment of teabags...
    I can guess, it might be quite like the treatment of eggs!

    >And nothing whatsoever to do with tea, this sketch had me laughing (I'm old enough to just remember it the first time round)

    A good sketch indeed. Good ole times when music in cinema and cartoons was played by a symphonic orchestra, not a synthesizer. And the orchestra jokes were well-understood (like the Pink Panther episode).

    Though my listening skills aren't good enough to get the full flavour of it. Well, I was capable to hear that Wise called Previn 'Preview' and, once, maybe 'Privy'(?) but his 'Andrew' instead of 'Andre' was quite ok with me.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 487 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > The survey here records the things that irritate most about travelling by public transport in London.
    >
    > https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/shortcuts/2017/aug/21/what-is-the-most-annoying-thing-you-can-do-on-public-transport?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H+categories&utm_term=240411&subid=11006640&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2

    Eating in public transport is really outrageous. I can't reckon it here. Women doing makeup or brushing the hair - I've seen once or maybe twice. In general, there's no difference to any other megapolis.

    One should be thankful that there's no need for train pushers like those that they keep in the Tokyo subway:
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 26,992 mod
    Sometimes they probably could do with them @Practical_Severard. I have several times had to let a few trains go before I found one where I could squeeze myself on.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 26,992 mod
    @Practical_Severard André was born Andreas Ludwig Priwin and is an American-German-Jew who fled Germany in 1939. He's 88 years old now!

    At the age of 19 he was performing on the piano and was already making a name for himself arranging and composing Hollywood film scores. In 1968, he became the principal conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra until 1979 and was also principal conductor of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra 1985 -1988. Hence he did not have to travel too far to feature in Morecambe and Wise's comedy show!


  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 487 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    >Hence he did not have to travel too far to feature in Morecambe and Wise's comedy show!
    Well, nevertheless he managed to leave his baton in Chicago ;)
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 5,307 mod
    mheredge said:

    Ugh, brewing up with 64 PG Tips teabags in one go? I have a friend who literally just shows the teabag to the hot water. I reckon I can get two decent strength cups from one teabag.

    In my search for Morecambe's treatment of teabags @Practical_Severard (in which I failed), I was reminded at how terribly British and hilarious Morecambe and Wise are.

    This gives a taster

    And nothing whatsoever to do with tea, this sketch had me laughing (I'm old enough to just remember it the first time round).

    My brother made me a cup of tea yesterday and it was way too strong. I only like to leave the teabag in for a short amount of time, and then add plenty of milk, but I think he left it in there for three times the time I would have done!
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 487 ✭✭✭
    edited August 23
    Could Thames meander skiffing be considered 'terribly British' nowdays?
    I watched a Soviet mini-series based on the Jerome K. Jerome's book 'Three men in a boat not forgetting the dog'.

    http://www.skiffhire.com/index.html
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 26,992 mod
    Absolutely old man. Spiffingly good fun. Three Men in a Boat could not be more terribly British @Practical_Severard.
Sign In or Register to comment.