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"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February
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Do you prefer to live in the country, a village, town, or the city?

1235

Comments

  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 9,432 mod
    @mheredge do you really think all the people of the older generation are more selfish? There are a lot of people of the babyboomer generation who care for the future of their offsprings. As grandfather and grandmother you can be a good example for your grandchildren. As example I never use plastic emballages and I tell them why. I also learn them to sort different materal so it can be used again. And I take a lot of times the bike, this is a good acquired habit from our early years and I tell my grandchilderen that cycling is a good thing. There are many examples to make the grandchildren alert to the future I think....
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,819 mod
    Maybe not in your country but yes, I'm afraid to say that a convincing majority of the older generation in the UK are thought to have been this way, at least by the younger generation.

    I think that there are a lot of very selfish people but @Paulette, in your line of work and experience, you have seen the very best of humankind. Nurses, doctors, teachers - anyone working in the caring services by the nature of what they do are likely to be much less selfish than you're average banker, office worker, taxi driver or whatever.
  • elancer2013elancer2013 Posts: 145 ✭✭✭
    Yes i completely agree with you @mheredge
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,367 mod
    mheredge said:

    Maybe not in your country but yes, I'm afraid to say that a convincing majority of the older generation in the UK are thought to have been this way, at least by the younger generation.

    I think that there are a lot of very selfish people but @Paulette, in your line of work and experience, you have seen the very best of humankind. Nurses, doctors, teachers - anyone working in the caring services by the nature of what they do are likely to be much less selfish than you're average banker, office worker, taxi driver or whatever.

    There are selfish people in every generation, but there is no doubt that young people in the UK at the moment are struggling, and it doesn't seem as though the older generation are concerned enough to want to do anything about it.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,819 mod
    I think is is harder for young people in the UK than its ever been @GemmaRowlands. I'm ashamed how some in my generation and certainly many more in the older generation have really betrayed the younger generation.
  • lisalisa Posts: 937 ✭✭✭
    I prefer to live in a city during the winter time, because there is established heating system compared with the countryside, which makes the child freely to play in all of the houses instead of wearing too much clothes. And it is very convience to buy some vegitables and other food materials in the city. The transport is wonderful, too. But it is too hot during the summer time living in a city, at that time, I prefer to live in a countryside, there are lots of fresh green vegitables and cute animals.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,819 mod
    I'm looking forward to wearing winter clothes and cold weather believe it or not @lisa. I like piling on layers of warm clothes when it's cold and don't like over heated homes.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 786 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    Nurses, doctors, teachers - anyone working in the caring services by the nature of what they do are likely to be much less selfish than you're average banker, office worker, taxi driver or whatever.

    Actually, no. Doctors have to deal with people's suffering too much and they develop well-known professional cynicism because of this. It's a unconscious defense mechanism of one's mind and it switches on without realising by the person. Of course, doctors are rational beings and aren't particularly evil, so they try to control their moods, but they are also subject to stress. Moreover, far too many patients are difficult to be respected because of their irresponsible lifestyles, what are the real reason of their health problems too often.

    Many children are also nice only when you look at them from afar, so a teacher has a similar problem.

    On the other hand, one can better keep a naive positive attitude towards humanity if he has to deal only with nature, animals or machines.
  • JMAROUFJMAROUF Posts: 63 ✭✭
    you're right @mheredge the villages in winter is annoying and you can face difficulties to live for me i prefer city , all things are accessible and is full in all seasons and you will not fed up
  • swathiswathi Posts: 42 ✭✭
    I will prefer all why because some people like live in villages and some peoples like live in city and towns. some people habituated live in villages why because they addicted the village weather and that culture. if some reasons they will come to towns they can't stay here. Now -a -days all are shifting to town and cities for their Children education.
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 9,432 mod
    edited October 2017
    @Practical_Severard said: Moreover, far too many patients are difficult to be respected because of their irresponsible lifestyles, what are the real reason of their health problems too often.

    Don't you think that many people make sin in their lifestyle, but in this way to say they it is difficult to respect them by the doctor is a non human thought. Everyone has right to be treath with respect.

    When you choose to do a job, than you must it to do with responsibilty I think, and you may have no prejudice.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 786 ✭✭✭
    > @Paulette said:
    >
    > Don't you think that many people make sin in their lifestyle, but in this way to say they it is difficult to respect them by the doctor is a non human thought. Everyone has right to be treath with respect.
    >
    > When you choose to do a job, than you must it to do with responsibilty I think, and you may have no prejudice.

    I think we mean different things. You speak about what a doctor/nurse shows to such a patient and me - about what he feels.

    A quote from a doctor found on the Internet:

    "You don't get to be 300 lbs without stuffing your face with garbage and laying around on your @ss, and yet my team is tinkering with your insulin dosages and all of your fat person medical problems, in scientific isolation. I could spend a career investigating the grays of degrees in pharmaceutical efficacy in some narrowed parameter in the health of the obese and people will multiply their ranks in this morbidity by the millions nonetheless. You would have to be out of your f'n mind not to be cynical about the repetitive nature of these encounters. It's a healthy reaction.

    That doesn't have to mean I don't have compassion for my obese patient. In fact maybe my cynicism forces me to think out of the box to try to reach the person. To inspire any attempt to actually modify lifestyle instead of continuing to diligently chart my way along the person's natural decline towards death. In perfectly reasonable and responsible medical management.

    So I see cynicism as an active struggle of the mind against the futile and the inevitable. "
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,367 mod
    mheredge said:

    Maybe not in your country but yes, I'm afraid to say that a convincing majority of the older generation in the UK are thought to have been this way, at least by the younger generation.

    I think that there are a lot of very selfish people but @Paulette, in your line of work and experience, you have seen the very best of humankind. Nurses, doctors, teachers - anyone working in the caring services by the nature of what they do are likely to be much less selfish than you're average banker, office worker, taxi driver or whatever.

    There are selfish people in every generation, but there is no doubt that young people in the UK at the moment are struggling, and it doesn't seem as though the older generation are concerned enough to want to do anything about it.
    mheredge said:

    I think is is harder for young people in the UK than its ever been @GemmaRowlands. I'm ashamed how some in my generation and certainly many more in the older generation have really betrayed the younger generation.

    People spend too much time thinking about how they can improve things for themselves, rather than bothering about helping other people who might be struggling to move forward in their lives.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,819 mod
    I think it depends on the country @Practical_Severard. In the UK doctors haven't learnt yet to be as self-seeking as doctors from the US for example.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 786 ✭✭✭
    edited October 2017
    > @mheredge said:
    > I think it depends on the country @Practical_Severard. In the UK doctors haven't learnt yet to be as self-seeking as doctors from the US for example.

    Or they're better in hypocrisy. Have you watched the "Cardiac Arrest" aired by BBC1? "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardiac_Arrest_(TV_series)" ? Which is described as the "the most close to reality" show in the first lines of the Wikipedia's article and depicts a lot of cynicism in the British hospitals.

    I'm not going to bash the British doctors or any other doctors for cynicism, my point is that any person who has to deal with human pain and suffering on everyday basis needs to develop some sort of psychological defense against it. And I seriously doubt that they are the most compassionate people.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 786 ✭✭✭
    edited October 2017
    I've read a lot of revelations by Russian freshly converted Christian Orthodox believers who cheerfully took up the charity work of helping the homeless people. Most of the latter in Russia are alcoholics, so much of the collected money they received they spent on booze. When the activists switched to distributing food, those in their care were grateful too, but they realised quite soon that the food donations had been mainly a help to save money for booze. Many of the activists lost their enthusiasm because of this saying that being a saint wasn't an easy task. This doesn't mean though, that they have quit this mission. Some deans have even banned giving the homeless anything only as a pay for some kind of work for the church. 'If you want to eat then take this broomstick, sweep this yard and you'll be fed'.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,516 ✭✭✭✭
    I’d prefer to live in the city. In th city, I can have easier access to necessary things than living in the country. When I want to enjoy the countryside, I can just drive there and come back home.
    ( ´ ▽ ` )ノ
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,819 mod
    I have to agree @takafromtokyo, citylife is a lot easier but I will be glad to leave Kathmandu with all its dirt, pollution, traffic congestion and noise. Although Nice is also a city (fifth largest in France), it is clean, quiet - at least where I live - and the traffic is fairly well managed. In addition I have the sea and mountains close by.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,516 ✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge
    You seem to be doing fine, and I’m happyabout it!
    Nice sounds like a great place to live. You have both mountains and oceans nearby; Id give you an A+ for that!
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,819 mod
    Yes I do feel very lucky having both @takafromtokyo. Nice is not so big either, so it is just a 20 minutes walk to the sea (Mediterranean) and an hour or so on the bus or train to get into the Alpes Maritimes. I'm also lucky as I'm only an hour bu bus or train from Italy too.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,516 ✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge
    You made me want to visit Nice right now, so I went to YouTube videos for substitute, and I found this little town guide video.



    Nice is not just about mountains and oceans, but the labyrinth of twisting small side streets are definitely something I’d want to get lost in. What a beautiful town! ヾ(๑╹◡╹)ノ"

    So, I bet you need a scooter bike to live there comfortably.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,367 mod

    I’d prefer to live in the city. In th city, I can have easier access to necessary things than living in the country. When I want to enjoy the countryside, I can just drive there and come back home.

    ( ´ ▽ ` )ノ

    That is very true, but I also think it is nice to enjoy the quietness of the countryside too. I think I need two houses, one in the city and one in the country!
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 9,432 mod
    It is nice to live at the countryside of a city because then you can enjoy the nature and the quietness and you are also in a 20 minutes into the city where you can find everything.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,516 ✭✭✭✭
    @GemmaRowlands
    That’ll be just great, only if you have enough capacity to take care of both houses. I’d love to have several houses each in a place where I’d want to visit from time to time. I would be doing a round trip touring my houses in that case. But keeping them nice and clean is going to cost me a lot of money, time, and effort, which would then destroy the initial purpose. Haha. Can’t be at multiple places at one time; it’s defying the physical law.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,516 ✭✭✭✭
    @Paulette @GemmaRowlands
    How did you like the tour guide video of Nice I’d posted. I’m jealous that @mheredge lives in the place. Could we recognize her in the video? Haha.

    What kind of place are you living now? Are you living in the countryside or the city?

    I live in a city called Hachiouji in the west of Tokyo. It’s not too big, not too crowded. I can find pretty much everything I need in just about a 20min drive area. There’s a mountain where I can visit by train, and if I drive, I can visit higher mountains in less than an hour. I love where I live now. The only downside of it is it takes too long to get to the beach, and to my office. I don’t have to take my clients into consideration since they are all far away anyway.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 29,819 mod
    I walk everywhere @takafromtokyo, as Nice isn't so big and most places are easy to get to without even having to get a bus. Buses are cheap and go everywhere so sometimes if it's a bit far, I take a bus. There are three train lines converging on the city too, two heading into the mountains. It's very easy travelling all around the Côte d' Azur.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,516 ✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge
    Riding a bicycle around town in Nice would be a great experience, I think!
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 9,432 mod
    @takafromtokyo I live in a small city but I live not in the centre of the city but at the border of it, and in my area there are a lot of meadows and ponds where you can hear the sound of the nature such like the noise of frogs and also the noise of cows and sheep. There is even an owl in the vicinity.
    I like cycling and many times I cycle from my house to the city in 30 minutes.
  • lisalisa Posts: 937 ✭✭✭
    @Paulette cycling is one of the best exercised ways in my mind
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 9,432 mod
    @lisa it keeps me fit and gives me grateful moments of deep thoughts.
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