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There is wind where the rose was,
Cold rain where sweet grass was,
And clouds like sheep
Stream o'er the steep
Grey skies where the lark was.

Nought warm where your hand was,
Nought gold where your hair was,
But phantom, forlorn,
Beneath the thorn,
Your ghost where your face was.

Cold wind where your voice was,
Tears, tears where my heart was,
And ever with me,
Child, ever with me,
Silence where hope was.

November by Walter de la Mare
No shadow
No stars
No moon
No cars
November only believes
In a pile of dead leaves
And a moon
That's the color of bone.

No prayers for November
To linger longer
To remember.

November has tied me
To an old dead tree
Get word to April
To rescue me.

November's cold chain
Made of wet boots and rain
And shiny black ravens
On chimney smoke lanes
November seems odd
An act of God
November.

Adapted from Tom Waits - November

November comes
And November goes,
With the last red berries
And the first white snows.

With night coming early,
And dawn coming late,
And ice in the bucket
And frost by the gate.

The fires burn
And the kettles sing,
And earth sinks to rest
Until next spring.

November by Elizabeth Coatsworth
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Comments

  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 7,321 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @jackelliot This poem shows the courage and pride of the people in Manchester and is a support for the many suffering that caused the attack.
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 755 OTT
    I heard him reading it in Manchester yesterday @Paulette
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 10,373 mod
    Manchester United won the Europe League 2017?
    Well done, despite of the sorrow which is overshadowing the city and also anybody of us.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,081 mod
    They had a very serious IRA bomb attack back in 1996. It was the biggest bomb since the Second World War to explode in Britain up to then and though over 200 people were injured, no one died. The IRA called 90 minutes before it was set off and 75,000 people were evacuated. The bomb blew up much of the main Arndale Shopping Precinct in the centre of the city.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1996_Manchester_bombing
  • maykmayk Posts: 156 ✭✭
    have mercy for Manchester
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 755 OTT
    @mheredge I was brought up amidst this violence of sectarianism
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 605 ✭✭✭
    > @jackelliot said:
    >
    > A Poem to read for reflection
    >
    > http://jackelliot.over-blog.com/2017/05/manchester-is-the-place-by-tony-walsh.html

    Today we have so many insane people who choose to achieve their political goals by killing some civilians. Even terrorists used to be rational before, blowing up officials, not common people.
  • filauziofilauzio Posts: 1,614 ✭✭✭✭✭
    ' ... And this is the place where our folks came to work, where they struggled in puddles, they hurt in the dirt and they built us a city, they built us these towns and they coughed on the cobbles to the deafening sound to the steaming machines and the screaming of slaves, they were scheming for greatness, they dreamed to their graves...

    ... And this is the place where we first played as kids. And me mum, lived and died here, she loved it, she did... '

    When joining you in this thread, I was sure I was going to grow more and more sad; on the contrary, while reading the poem, my tears promptly dried up, my forehead raised, and I felt proud of Manchester people's attitude.
    Wherever they be, might the kids rejoice for ever.
    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,081 mod
    I'm not sure if it's just Mancunians who are like this or whether it is a more general national trait @filauzio. Whatever can be said about British people, they are good at coming together when there is an emergency. There was another attack on one of London's bridges (London Bridge this time) and people were killed at Borough Market last night. There are times when Facebook has its uses as I was able to check easily this morning that my friends in London were all safe.
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 755 OTT
    @mheredge of that borough area I have many stories

    one of them is that I once worked for NCCL there

    http://jackelliot.over-blog.com/2017/06/true-happiness.html
  • filauziofilauzio Posts: 1,614 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I heard of the new attack in London and tried to get deeper into the news by listening to BBC global service podcast.
    There I listened to the voices of eyewitnesses, with noises of real life in the background: every now and again the loudly screaming ambulances' sirens; one time I even heard the crows going rhytmically as that: ' caw...caw...caw ' but I grasped ' cowards...cowards...cowards '.
    I know British people will be strong enough to face and confront with the consequences of this new attack, @mheredge.
    PM Theresa May is right by saying: ' Our values are stronger than theirs '.
    While suffering this new attack, a concert was being performed in Manchester's Old Strafford stadium, they all were British citizens gathered together and their singing' echoes arrived to my town in Italy too: they were singing something, but I grasped but the final words: they were something like ' ... stronger than yours... stronger than yours... stronger than
    yours
    !! '.
    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,081 mod
    This shows your typical British sense of humour in the face of adversity @filauzio. In particular the use of 'reeling' by the American press had British folk bemused (a Scottish reel?)



    The hashtag #ThingsThatLeaveBritainReeling might be worth checking out if you use Twitter. https://t.co/HpKzmnfAfW

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/jun/05/london-bridge-attack-brings-out-defiant-british-humour?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H+categories&utm_term=229148&subid=11006640&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2
  • filauziofilauzio Posts: 1,614 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I hope @mheredge, that I've not turned out disrespectful in any way here to the suffering of so many people; it absolutely wasn't what I wanted to render with my comment.
    It's always difficult to use the words to comment such terrible events; but then, maybe, this is one among the purposes of terrorists: to terrorize our sense of humour too.
    Thank you for sharing the article; unfortunately I'm not using Twitter so far.
    Do you really think that in the mind of the American journalist who worked out the headlines, there was the intention of writing down a pun involving the two possible meanings of the verb ' to reel ' ? It would be too disturbing a case of genuine black humour. It seems strange to me that many British people might have mistaken.
    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
  • filauziofilauzio Posts: 1,614 ✭✭✭✭✭
    This is priceless @mheredge:

    A pint of London Pride

    Meanwhile, a man who was pictured holding tightly to a half-full pint glass of beer as he fled the London Bridge attack has become an unlikely hero.

    As the commentator on Twitter said: ' God bless the Brits '

    Totally agree !!! :)
    glad to stop strict diet, splashed in belly flop? Don't care you're not light, here on English hop !
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