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Cyberattack

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Comments

  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 934 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > @Practical_Severard, @Vok and @GemmaRowlands you may be intrigued to hear that the latest news is that Farage is calling for a second referendum? Really?
    >
    > https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jan/11/farage-second-referendum-remainers-britain-eu?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=Opinion+UK+connected&utm_term=260165&subid=11006640&CMP=ema_opinionconnectuk

    Well, as the article says it gives a chance to the anti-Brexit public, though the very idea isn't cricket. What will you do if the outcome is remaining? A third referendum?
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    I saw an interesting analysis that suggested that even if there was a second referendum, the likelihood would be a switch but only with a small majority in favour of remaining. So then it is the same problem. What is democracy?

    I can only hope @Practical_Severard that the government can come to its senses to try to work for an agreement that doesn't leave Britain crashing out with no concessions at all.

    The City is despondent and Sadiq Khan is forecasting a lot of job losses.

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/comment/brexit-exposes-our-reliance-on-the-city-bm250j0p2

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/jan/11/brexit-uk-could-lose-half-a-million-jobs-with-no-deal-says-sadiq-khan?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H+categories&utm_term=260178&subid=11006640&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,909 mod
    mheredge said:
    Yes, I have seen that. And I think it's silly. You can't just keep holding referendums until you get the result you want.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    I don't think they'll go through this process again, but another election might be more likely given the tiny majority that's based on the Irish DUDs. I still haven't worked out how the Irish border issue is being resolved.

    I found the Times' headlines about France lending the Bayeaux tapestry to the British Museum slightly poor taste, referring to this in a Brexit connection! Even the Metro steered clear of commenting on it in this way.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    More in the news about cyberattacks. So the UK has been lucky but "The head of the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre has warned that a major cyber-attack on the UK is a matter of “when, not if”, raising the prospect of devastating disruption to British elections and critical infrastructure."

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/jan/22/cyber-attack-on-uk-matter-of-when-not-if-says-security-chief-ciaran-martin?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H+categories&utm_term=261450&subid=11006640&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 30,268 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    it means the next possible war will be through these cyberattacks. @mheredge
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    Cyber-terrorism is a real threat @Bubbly. Last year hackers brought down the NHS computer systems which led to chaos for days and operations cancelled.
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 30,268 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    cyber terrorism is the worst form of cyberattacks, no wonder how much it will bring chaos in the world. Whatsapp has already sent warning to not respond to unknown calls, messages, links as they may be linked to terrorism.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    I have seen quite a few messages on Facebook from friends warning people not to open emails or attachments seemingly sent by them, as their accounts have been hacked. Facebook gives an alternative way to warn at least those other people who use it @Bubbly.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,909 mod
    mheredge said:

    I have seen quite a few messages on Facebook from friends warning people not to open emails or attachments seemingly sent by them, as their accounts have been hacked. Facebook gives an alternative way to warn at least those other people who use it @Bubbly.

    The problem is with those messages is that it can look exactly as though your friend has sent you a link, so it is easy to click on it without thinking.
  • VokVok Posts: 630 ✭✭✭
    I agree @GemmaRowlands , sometimes it's hard not to be conned. Twice I've received messages via Skype from my colleagues. One was asking for money and the other sent me a dodgy-looking link to open. Both of the accounts had been hacked apparently.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    edited January 29
    My account was hacked once and some friends received a weird message supposedly from me with a long talk of woe, asking for money to be wired to the Philippines where I was reportedly in trouble. One friend did check I was okay, which was how I found out.
    Post edited by mheredge on
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 30,268 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @GemmaRowlands it happened to my friend once and she lost all her data on mobile after that. I have no idea about hacking but the password of her email account changed immediately after she clicked on the link. I am a bit hesitant of clicking on the links that are even sent by my friends.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    Me too, I tend not to open any links unless I'm very sure of what it is @Bubbly.
  • VokVok Posts: 630 ✭✭✭
    I usually google a link before opening it and I even google a phone number before taking a call. Better safe than sorry.
  • nomad81nomad81 Posts: 565 ✭✭✭
    A way of cyberattack can be a system named blockchain. It is a system of scattered databases. It is almost not for hacking but it has many weakness. Primary is a huge power electric intake, an one transaction is equal a typical daily demand on electric power for a household.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 934 ✭✭✭
    edited January 29
    > @nomad81 said:
    > A way of cyberattack can be a system named blockchain. It is a system of scattered databases. It is almost not for hacking but it has many weakness. Primary is a huge power electric intake, an one transaction is equal a typical daily demand on electric power for a household.

    The system administrator here has been mining bitcoins. He said that this technology has already become unuseable because a transaction takes a couple of days to be completed. That's due to the risen number of users. The Etherium, he said, was a quite different thing. My guess is that whether the blockchain technology has succeeded as a new type of currency it'll certainly be a possible breathrough in the electronic document field as well as in the inter-bank money transfer. So the SWIFT's time is probably ticking out.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    With the way telecommunications and the inter has developed, I don't understand why it should take so long to process the transactions @Practical_Severard. I must be missing something.
  • nomad81nomad81 Posts: 565 ✭✭✭
    Bitcoin, Etherium as new type currency will have resistant to cyberattack. A blockchain technology can solve a problem of safety data which is changed between users and or companies. If I understand a principle blockchain, it rely on that each transaction have to be an authorized by previous. It limits a chance on a cheat.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 934 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > With the way telecommunications and the inter has developed, I don't understand why it should take so long to process the transactions @Practical_Severard. I must be missing something.

    As I've learned that's a limitation of the Bitcoin technology. A blockchain is a analogue of a page of encrypted transaction records which corresponds to a certain period of time. This page can contain a fixed number of records and, since the number of users has increased dramatically, the today's transactions must wait for a free slot. The designer(s) whoever they were, just didn't expect such popularity.

    Nowdays there are more than 100 of competing blockchain networks based on more advanced algorithms. A notable one is Ripple which is offered as a remittance option by an increasing number of financial institutions, including Bank of America and HSBC.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ripple_(payment_protocol)#Focus_on_banking_market_(2014%E2%80%9317)
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    Thanks @Practical_Severard. I obviously need to update myself on the subject. I left the banking environment 14 years ago and never need to think much about it except when I want to transfer pounds out into euros :'( I used to just transfer bank to bank but I now use a money transfer service that give a better rate without any fees like the bank charges.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    I hear a couple of banks in the Netherlands have been victims of cyberattacks very recently.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 934 ✭✭✭
    edited February 1
    Digest from the New York Times' article titled The Follower Factory (28/01/2018)

    Read the original at: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/27/technology/social-media-bots.html

    ***

    In November, Facebook disclosed that it had at least twice as many fake users as it previously estimated, indicating that up to 60 million automated accounts may roam the social media platform. These fake accounts, known as bots, can help sway advertising audiences and reshape political debates. They can defraud businesses and ruin reputations. Yet their creation and sale fall into a legal gray zone.

    [Fake] accounts are counterfeit coins in the booming economy of online influence, reaching into virtually any industry where a mass audience — or the illusion of it — can be monetized. By some calculations, nearly 15 percent of Twitter’s reported active users are automated accounts designed to simulate real people, though the company claims that number is far lower.

    The accounts that most resemble real people, like Ms. Rychly, whose social identity was stolen by a Twitter bot when she was in high school, reveal a kind of large-scale social identity theft. At least 55,000 of the accounts use the names, profile pictures, hometowns and other personal details of real Twitter users, including minors, according to a Times data analysis.

    Despite rising criticism of social media companies and growing scrutiny by elected officials, the trade in fake followers has remained largely opaque. While Twitter and other platforms prohibit buying followers, Devumi and dozens of other sites openly sell them.

    Devumi sells Twitter followers and retweets to anyone who wants to appear more popular or exert influence online. Drawing on an estimated stock of at least 3.5 million automated accounts, each sold many times over, the company has provided customers with more than 200 million Twitter followers, a New York Times investigation found. For just pennies each — sometimes even less — Devumi offers […] views on YouTube, plays on SoundCloud, the music-hosting site, and endorsements on LinkedIn, the professional-networking site.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 934 ✭✭✭
    edited February 1
    Among other things, if someone wants to buy anything expensive and, like it happens in such cases, looks through social networks for accounts by the customers, he must beware!
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    It should make users of social media all the more skeptical about how popular stories or products are from the number of 'likes' @Practical_Severard. To be honest I don't to be bothered by how many people have registered their approval for things. TripAdvisor is a common one where figures are so easily distorted when the number of reviewers is small - which is before you have the problem of fake reviews.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,909 mod
    Vok said:

    I agree @GemmaRowlands , sometimes it's hard not to be conned. Twice I've received messages via Skype from my colleagues. One was asking for money and the other sent me a dodgy-looking link to open. Both of the accounts had been hacked apparently.

    I always check any links that I am about to click on to make sure they are correct, and I am very careful before I put any further details in when I strange link has sent me there.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,553 mod
    My browser warns me if the website I am being directed to is dubious and I nearly always close it immediately, even if it is something that looked interesting @GemmaRowlands.
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