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There is wind where the rose was,
Cold rain where sweet grass was,
And clouds like sheep
Stream o'er the steep
Grey skies where the lark was.

Nought warm where your hand was,
Nought gold where your hair was,
But phantom, forlorn,
Beneath the thorn,
Your ghost where your face was.

Cold wind where your voice was,
Tears, tears where my heart was,
And ever with me,
Child, ever with me,
Silence where hope was.

November by Walter de la Mare
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How much would you pay for a stick?

LynneLynne Your TeacherHomePosts: 9,594 mod
edited March 31 in Work and Money
A florist's in London, is selling sticks for customers to hang on their walls.

How much for these decorative items? The price ranges from £12 to £18, depending on the shape and size.

The best thing is, this florists is next to a park.



Read more about this topic:
http://www.itv.com/news/london/2017-03-29/london-florist-next-to-a-park-sells-sticks-for-18/
Post edited by Lynne on
«13

Comments

  • GauravGaurav Posts: 56 ✭✭
    I like the way you think.@frank
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,171 mod
    That's a very good point @Frank. Those sticks are so ordinary but then again, maybe for a city dweller, not so bog standard.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 615 ✭✭✭
    > @Lynne said:
    > A florists in London, is selling sticks for customers to hang on their walls.

    A question of English: "a florist's" or "a florists"? The latter one is plural, so I doubt about the indefinite article.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 615 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > bog standard.

    Thanks for the vocabulary item.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,171 mod
    It should be a florist @Practical_Severard.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 615 ✭✭✭
    edited March 30
    > @Lynne said:
    > How much for these decorative items? The price ranges from £12 to £18, depending on the shape and size.
    >

    Well, a price depends on curcumstances. What's the price of a cup of water in middle of a lake? Nothing. How much would an exhausted thirsty person pay in middle of a desert? A fortune. "A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!"

    When I was in London in 2005 the price for a ball of ice-cream near The London's Eye was £2 . I could have bought 20 in my home country with the exchange rate of that time.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 5,767 mod
    Wow that is incredibly odd. But fair play to the florist - if people are willing to pay that amount for something they could pick up off the ground then why not make money from it?!
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 10,405 mod
    I still have one Christmas tree stick here. You can have it for free. It's a good one and It's from the year 2015.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,171 mod

    > @Lynne said:

    >
    When I was in London in 2005 the price for a ball of ice-cream near The London's Eye was £2 . I could have bought 20 in my home country with the exchange rate of that time.


    I dread to think how much an ice cream costs in London these days @Practical_Severard. I did have a really nice one for 2.5€ near Lake Como in Italy the other week. This is not far off half the price it would have cost here in Nice. But then Nice is probably charging not that far from London prices.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 615 ✭✭✭
    edited March 30
    > @mheredge said:
    > I dread to think how much an ice cream costs in London these days . I did have a really nice one for 2.5€ near Lake Como in Italy the other week. This is not far off half the price it would have cost here in Nice. But then Nice is probably charging not that far from London prices.

    Well, I think, the locals know the places and don't buy anything in the city centre. Probably, most of them haven't been there for years.

    2.5€ buys 2 pieces of this

    vkusvill.ru/sites/default/files/styles/product_page_image/public/images/goods/13933.jpg?itok=b2RcAkE3

    here
  • MichouxeMichouxe Posts: 3,835 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I fear that I never want to pay for the stick, but I will use idea’s and possible other things buy of the florist! perhaps am I a little bit miserly? :|
  • chyijungchyijung Posts: 2,141 ✭✭✭✭
    If you could sell a stick with that prices, you would be able to sell everything.
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,594 mod
    edited March 31
    @Practical_Severard - Quite often we treat organisations and businesses as if they are people. A florist's = the shop / a florist = someone who works in the shop. I've added the apostrophe to make it clearer.
    Post edited by Lynne on
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,594 mod
    We discussed this last night in Kitely. It was a very funny discussion, and I might just edit it and put it here.

    What do you think @oscar001 @Monik @Zom @gam01hr? Are you okay with that?
  • ZomZom Shadok Posts: 2,844 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 31
    @Lynne - Okay for the "How much for a stick?" part of the session.
    Post edited by Zom on
    It befits a man to be merry and glad
    Until the day of his death.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 615 ✭✭✭
    > @Lynne said:
    > @Practical_Severard - Quite often we treat organisations and businesses as if they are people. A florist's = the shop / a florist = someone who works in the shop. I've added the apostrophe to make it clearer.

    Thank you. The apostrophe has made it clear - now the sentence matches what I've learned.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 615 ✭✭✭
    Can one refer to those sticks as "twigs?" At least googling pictures with the "twig" query brings mostly severed twigs.

    Am I right that a "bough" is something which hasn't beensevered from a tree?

    “I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself.”
    (D.H. Lawrence)
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 737 ✭✭✭✭
    Given what @Frank said, I have a suggestion for the florist. They can hammer a nail into some of the sticks, and sell the 'with hook' version for 50£. It will make the 18£ sticks look very cheap!
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,171 mod
    I think for the 'rustic look' people might spend money to buy a stick if they never get out into the countryside. In my friends' homes in Nepal, I'm afraid a stick like this would make good firewood and wouldn't last long.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 615 ✭✭✭
    edited March 31
    > @mheredge said:
    > I think for the 'rustic look' people might spend money to buy a stick if they never get out into the countryside.
    Is it possible to pick up a stick in the UK? IMO, in that country all the land is owned by someone, therefore picking up a stick may be qualified as a theft.
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,594 mod
    @zom - that's the bit I'm thinking about. It will have to be next week, and I might just take the mp3 and broadcast it on English Radio. (/me puts thinking cap on.)
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,594 mod
    @Practical_Severard - Good point. People have been hung for less.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 5,767 mod
    mheredge said:

    I think for the 'rustic look' people might spend money to buy a stick if they never get out into the countryside. In my friends' homes in Nepal, I'm afraid a stick like this would make good firewood and wouldn't last long.

    Yes, that is true. I suppose if you live in the middle of London, for example, you won't really get to see many places where you could just pick sticks up like you can where I live.
  • chyijungchyijung Posts: 2,141 ✭✭✭✭
    @GemmaRowlands @mheredge A friend of mine who is also a travel agent told me once he brought a group of tourist to a suburb area. They saw a chicken on the street. A little boy in the group asked his mom what was that, when told it was a chicken, the boy were so surprised said: "How come a chicken has feather?"
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,171 mod
    You might get away with it if you find the stick on common land @Practical_Severard. Epping Forest still has laws going back centuries that allow farmers to graze their cattle freely here. But then they might worry that you were collecting the stick to burn. In London I think the area is a Smokeless Zone, so you might have to go a few miles further to Essex where I think you are still allowed to burn wood.

    https://www.gov.uk/smoke-control-area-rules
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 615 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > You might get away with it if you find the stick on common land
    I suspected the things weren't that bad :)

    >Epping Forest still has laws going back centuries that allow farmers to graze their cattle freely here.
    How much would a 1st Tube zone dweller pay to get there? A 2 ways metro ticket costs a comparable price, I guess.

    >
    But then they might worry that you were collecting the stick to burn. In London I think the area is a Smokeless Zone, so you might have to go a few miles further to Essex where I think you are still allowed to burn wood.
    >
    The sticks on the photo aren't good firewood. You need to collect a heap of them for such use.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 28,171 mod
    You're right @Practical_Severard. A little twig like this would only keep the fire going ten minutes or so. You'd need a whole pile and at £12-18 a stick, that's a very expensive fire.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 5,767 mod
    chyijung said:

    @GemmaRowlands @mheredge A friend of mine who is also a travel agent told me once he brought a group of tourist to a suburb area. They saw a chicken on the street. A little boy in the group asked his mom what was that, when told it was a chicken, the boy were so surprised said: "How come a chicken has feather?"

    I suppose lots of people have only ever seen 'chicken' on a plate, and never the actual animal. Even where I live in the countryside you don't see chickens very often, so I suppose children could go for years without knowing what they really were!
  • clairclair Posts: 30 ✭✭
    Sometimes it's the idea that costs rather than the item itself.
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