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By all these lovely tokens
September days are here,
With summer’s best of weather
And autumn’s best of cheer.

Helen Hunt Jackson - September
The breezes taste
Of apple peel.
The air is full
Of smells to feel-
Ripe fruit, old footballs,
Burning brush,
New books, erasers,
Chalk, and such.
The bee, his hive,
Well-honeyed hum,
And Mother cuts
Chrysanthemums.
Like plates washed clean
With suds, the days
Are polished with
A morning haze.

John Updike, September
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Regional Food

LynneLynne Your TeacherHomePosts: 9,478 mod
Every country has its own cuisine, but within each country there are different regional dishes.

Do you know of any regional dishes in your country, or abroad?
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Comments

  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,478 mod
    Here's one that @Hermine might recognise:-

  • CamvelCamvel Posts: 65 ✭✭
    In France, the accompaniment very esteemed during Christmas or new year is the "foie gras" ! With a toast and a bit of fig jam, it's really delightful ! :p
  • mausermauser Posts: 23 ✭✭
    In Spain we have a well respected cuisine, nowadays cooking tv programs are fashionable, I think this trend is positive, at least is entertaining. One of the most famous dishes is the spanish omelette, just a few ingredients, easy to cook, but.... thousands of different results and tastes depending on the cooking, salt, quality of the potatoes, but specially, the sort of oil you use. Oil is frecuently used in Spain, but not so in the UK, am I right?
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 27,055 mod
    edited March 3
    I hate to say it @Camvel, but I really like foie gras, despite what all the vegetarians say. And @mauser, Spanish cuisine is wonderful. My friends in Madrid showed me how to make the best breakfast from tomatoes, grated onto toast with a bit of sea salt and olive oil.

    In Nice, the signature dish is unsurprisingly called Salade Nicoise. It is not any old common or garden, bog standard salad, but is a hearty meal in its own right.



    Ideally made with fresh tuna, tinned tuna is fine. It's quite adaptable too. Olives, anchovies and boiled egg are essential (dressed with a vinaigrette sauce), but then the salad can include boiled potato, tomatoes, green beans, lettuce or whatever you fancy.

    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/salade-nicoise-15533
    http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/seasons/what-should-you-be-cooking-in-february/salade-nicoise
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 721 ✭✭✭
    I like natto, fermented soybeans, and eat it everyday. But most people who live in western region in Japan hate it. They wince at its sticky texture and pungent smell, which I love it because of.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 5,327 mod
    In my town, people eat meat pie and mushy peas. It's not a dish that I like particularly, as it's very unhealthy, but it is certainly what people would think about when my town name is mentioned.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 6,248 mod
    @Lynne, thanks for the video. And, yes of course my family likes it too so much.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 27,055 mod
    edited March 4
    Am I right think that Japanese people are big, big fans of Udon noodles @Yellowtail, @Shiny03, @takafromtokyo? You might like this site: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/25/udon-recipes_n_6212044.html

    I found this very interesting website of noodle recipes from around Asia:

    https://matadornetwork.com/nights/65-ridiculously-delicious-asian-noodle-dishes/

    Yakisoba from Japan:


  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 721 ✭✭✭
    @mheredge
    Aside from the popularity of ramen for decades, two major traditional Japanese noodles are soba and udon. Generally speaking, I think the eastern people prefer soba, while the western people like udon. I myself, as a person growing up in the eastern region, almost only eat soba. How about you? @takafromtokyo @Shiny03

    As for yakisoba, the picture you gave is not what we call yakisoba. Actually we don't use soba for yakisoba, despite the name. We use wheat noodle which is more similar to ramen noodles. (But, yeah it's OK. Probably that Yakisoba is still not bad, I think.)
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,057 ✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge @Yellowtail @Shiny03

    I'm a big fan of udon. But recently, I'm beginning to like soba too. Yellowtail is right when he said the Yakisoba in the picture was not actually what we call yakisoba. Not just the noodles it used but I don't think it's not that popular to put broccolis in it. I don't mean to deny it though.
  • CamvelCamvel Posts: 65 ✭✭
    @mheredge
    I know well the Salade Nicoise and I found it fabulous. It's a gourmet but balanced dish (however, the Foie Gras is not really dietetics). I read that for 100g of Foie Gras, it's necessary to run to 3km for eliminate all the calories !
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 737 OTT
    .

    Pancakes are good with me


    Often use them for savoury tit-bits

    this is one way of cooking them


    http://jackelliot.over-blog.com/2017/02/a-pancake-done-in-spanish.html


    but sometimes I use porridge that is left over from breakfast


    .
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 27,055 mod
    I eat foie gras once in a blue moon @Camvel. But it is a nice treat. I love the cuisine of the south west of France. It's not just duck livers I like, but all the other dishes with duck like confit de canard and maigret de canard.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,057 ✭✭✭✭
    @jackelliot

    I like pancakes too. But it takes a little time to cook, plus it gets kind of messy so you're going to have a lot to clean up, that's why I don't make pancakes very often.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 5,327 mod
    mheredge said:

    Am I right think that Japanese people are big, big fans of Udon noodles @Yellowtail, @Shiny03, @takafromtokyo? You might like this site: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/25/udon-recipes_n_6212044.html

    I found this very interesting website of noodle recipes from around Asia:

    https://matadornetwork.com/nights/65-ridiculously-delicious-asian-noodle-dishes/

    Yakisoba from Japan:


    That looks absolutely delicious. I often try to make dishes like that for myself, but for some reason it never feels authentic, in the way that it would have done if I'd eaten it in another country.
  • CamvelCamvel Posts: 65 ✭✭
    Yes, I agree with you @mheredge ! All dishes with duck are just delicious.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 27,055 mod
    I'm not sure what is typical food in Berlin. I've found a nice Thai place near where I'm staying so have been eating here. Their wi-fi works well too.
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 737 OTT
    very tasty
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 27,055 mod
    I think tonight I will make something with udon noodles. I have a few prawns so I'm sure I can rustle something up.
  • chyijungchyijung Posts: 2,121 ✭✭✭✭
    I have Nasi Lemak (means Fatty Rice in Malay) for breakfast five consecutive days. It's a typical food in Malaysia. You can find it anywhere anytime here. The composition of Nasi Lemak is very simple. the coconut milk cooked rice is eaten with cucumbers, peanuts, fried anchovies, boiled egg and special made spicy sauce.



  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 27,055 mod
    That looks rather nice @chyijung, though I'm not sure I'd want it every day.

    In Brittany, they are famous for their galettes. These are very large pancakes. They are sold pre-prepared in packages and I had one this morning which I cooked up with some ricotta cheese, prawns and an egg. I wasn't sure that this combination of ingredients would work but it tasted good.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 5,327 mod
    mheredge said:

    That looks rather nice @chyijung, though I'm not sure I'd want it every day.

    In Brittany, they are famous for their galettes. These are very large pancakes. They are sold pre-prepared in packages and I had one this morning which I cooked up with some ricotta cheese, prawns and an egg. I wasn't sure that this combination of ingredients would work but it tasted good.

    That sounds really nice. I like eating savoury pancakes, but most people in England only really have them sweet.
  • chyijungchyijung Posts: 2,121 ✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge Well, I should not have it everyday. Spicy food can be a bit irritated to the body. I started to feel dyspepsia and pimples started popping out.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 27,055 mod
    I have a lot of Nepalese friends who complain to the same problem @chyijung. They eat rice and vegetable curry for almost all meals every day. I find it very monotonous.
  • chyijungchyijung Posts: 2,121 ✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge The same goes here. The restaurant I went serving Nasi Lemak from breakfast to supper. Luckily there are other restaurant nearby. I can't imagine to eat the same thing all day long.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 27,055 mod
    Sounds like an all day breakfast place @chyijung. There are restaurants that will serve full English breakfast all day which is a substantial meal of eggs, bacon, tomato, mushrooms, beans, toast and various other options like sausage and black pudding.
  • chyijungchyijung Posts: 2,121 ✭✭✭✭
    No @mheredge .It is different. If I see a menu as you mentioned above, I know it is breakfast. But I can't tell if Nasi Lemak is breakfast, lunch, dinner or supper. It is eaten all day long.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,057 ✭✭✭✭
    @chyijung

    I like hot and spicy food.
    What does a typical breakfast look like in your country? In Japan, people used to have rice, fish, miso soup, and several kinds of pickles for breakfast. Now, it's become really diverse.
  • chyijungchyijung Posts: 2,121 ✭✭✭✭
    @takafromtokyo
    My country, Malaysia is a multiracial society, consisting mainly of Malay, Chinese and Indian. So the food are also very diverse, depends on the population of the people who live there. Malay has the largest population in Malaysia, their usually have rice with different kinds of curry for breakfast.
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 27,055 mod
    I'm impressed by the wonderful local cuisine of Genoa. Apart from having a special recipe for pesto, the recipes of Liguria are delicious, with lovely fish dishes, special pastas, foccacia, olives - the list is endless.
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