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"The April rain, the April rain,
Comes slanting down in fitful showers,
Then from the furrow shoots the grain,
And banks are fledged with nestling flowers;
And in grey shawl and woodland bowers
The cuckoo through the April rain
Calls once again."

Mathilde Blind, April Rain
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Tell us a fact about a happening that occured in the past on today's date.

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Comments

  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 11,023 mod
    @prateek @jackelliot @takafromtokyo @mohit_singh

    13the March 1902 - For the first time a road is covered with asphalt in Monte Carlo. Inventor of the asphalt, the Swiss doctor Ernest Guglielminetti.
    When Guglielminetti worked in Monaco, he became interested as a pulmonologist at the problem of dusty roads in this city and in this context the problems this caused for the human respiratory tract. He remembered here again the application of tar by the Indonesians and then came up with the idea of paving the streets. On March 13, 1902 he left cover 40 meters surface with hot tar, and successfully. Not much later, the asphalting of several roads was in his native Switzerland undertaken.
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 815 OTT
    @Paulette

    John Loudon McAdam was a little bit earlier but it his name given to the asphalt roads throughout the world (Tarmac) ... {Scottish}
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,592 ✭✭✭✭
    @Paulette @jackelliot
    Thanks to all these people in the past, we can enjoy driving comfortably. Hats off to all the reasearchers and developers and, of course, everyone involved in actually paving the roads.
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 767 ✭✭✭✭
    @Paulette
    It's interesting the first motivation for asphalt pavement was a medical reason. I think horse carriages were still common at the time. But asphalt pavement brought the century of the automobile!
  • chyijungchyijung Posts: 2,143 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2017
    The witch doctor who performed ritual to find MH370 is on the television again. This time, he is harnessing the power to soften North Korean leader's heart so he would not nuke the country. Hopefully it works.
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 11,023 mod
    @prateek @takafromtokyo @mohit_singh @jackelliot

    March 14, 1883 death Karl Marx (64), German philosopher and founder of Marxism

    March 14, 1879 - Albert Einstein is born, German theoretical physicist (deceased 1955
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 11,023 mod
    @prateek @jackelliot @takafromtokyo @mohit_singh

    Today it was international Pi day

    Pi Day is celebrated on March 14th (3/14) around the world. Pi (Greek letter “π”) is the symbol used in mathematics to represent a constant — the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter — which is approximately 3.14159.

    Pi has been calculated to over one trillion digits beyond its decimal point.

    The current world record in the calculation of π stands on the name of the Japanese Yasumasa Kanada of the University of Tokyo. He came into his calculation of π to the incredible number of 206 billion digits, a feat which, incidentally, has no practical impact, but it gives an incredible feeling.
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 815 OTT
    @Paulette thank you for the Pi day
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,592 ✭✭✭✭
    @Paulette @jackelliot @Practical_Severard @Yellowtail @mohit_singh

    Pi reminds me of one thing that they did in math lessons in Japan. When they taught us about Pi when I was a kid, we were told it was 3.14...and we had to use 3.14 in calculations. Some years later, Japanese government decided that kids in Japan were studying too hard, They thought kids should have more time to themselves than just sitting at a desk and spending most of there time studying. They thought it was for the students' better life experiences and they called the arrangement in the curriculum "yutori-kyouiku". "Yutoriゆとり" means more time to relax. Through the arrangements, kids were then told to use 3 for Pi in calculations, which should make the calculations easier.

    How are Pi taught in your country? When was your first time to learn it? What is your Pi story?

  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 767 ✭✭✭✭
    @takafromtokyo
    Using 3 for Pi means that you consider a circle is the same as a regular hexagon. It's ridiculous! Although I heard using 3 in schools in Japan is only an option that teachers can use in their class at their discretion, so 3.14 is still used in most cases.

    By the way, when I was in elementary school, memorizing Pi came into fashion among my classmates for some reason. So I memorized it to about 40 places of decimals. I can still recite it today. It's one thing I'm proud of!
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,592 ✭✭✭✭
    @Yellowtail
    Wow! That's amazing!!
    Didn't it also become popular to memorize square root figures?
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 900 ✭✭✭
    edited March 2017
    > @takafromtokyo said:
    > @Practical_Severard
    > How are Pi taught in your country? When was your first time to learn it? What is your Pi story?
    I don't remember exactly the form in which pi was taught for the first time, may be it was in the 6th, so we were 12-13 y.o. We used 3.14 doing our assignments. We had learned the concept of irrational numbers by that time, so we could grasp the idea of infinite number of digits after the dot. We didn't learn the theory extensively, though. The teacher just told us the circle length measurement idea.
    (USSR->Russia)

    3.14 is enough for common everyday tasks, e. g. a home improvement project, while 3 is actually useless.
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 767 ✭✭✭✭
    @takafromtokyo
    No. We memorized Pi only because one of us found it in a book in the school library. Children often get into stupid things. Knowing 40 digits of Pi have never been useful for me!
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 900 ✭✭✭
    edited March 2017
    In high school doing tasks on math or physics didn't include calculating square roots. An answer for a task was an expression like 3*√2/2 not 2,121320344. All you had to do was building a fraction/expression and then having it simplified.

    The basic math courses in a university were the same. The applied ones weren't, of course. You were to provide a specific result with the precision specified for the application.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,708 mod
    Paulette said:

    @GemmaRowlands

    Do you think the leaflet with the explanation how a phone from Bell worked, was as complicated as a smartphone now?

    I think it would have seemed really complicated at the time, because people had never seen (or even considered) anything like it before. Whereas modern smartphones don't even come with instructions anymore!
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 11,023 mod
    @prateek @jackelliot @takafromtokyo @mohit_singh

    The Amoco Cadiz was a tanker that ran aground on March 16, 1978, five kilometers off the coast of Portsall, Ploudalmézeau town, in northwest Brittany (France).

    It became one of the largest environmental disasters in history. Cleaning up the oil lasted more than a year.
  • takafromtokyotakafromtokyo Posts: 2,592 ✭✭✭✭
    @Yellowtail
    Haha! But it certainly did increased your popularity rate, didn't it?

    @Practical_Severard
    Speaking of square root, we did the same here in Japan. We never used the figures themselves in calculations. I think it's almost like the mindset of a collector. When you see a set of things, or group of things, you want to gather them and show off how much you've collected to someone else. I think it made kids feel nice about themselves when they could recite quite a few digits of square roots. In Japan, we even have a pun for each square roots of up to I forgot exactly, and all the kids were like in a race to memorize them and show off. That's what happened where I grew up.
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 767 ✭✭✭✭
    @whoisdead
    Thank you for sharing the great experience! So what did you speak about then?
  • DartasDartas Posts: 19 ✭✭
    On March 16th, March, Adolf Hitler orders Germany to rearm herself in violation of the Treaty of Versailles. Conscription is reintroduced to form the Wehrmacht.


    --> This event shows the real intention of Hitler on the International Relationship. It seems to be the real begginning of the escalation which led to the 2nd World War because it shows that Hitler did not accept to do concession with European coutries, as the "Stresa front" in April can show that.

    PS : Sorry for the second part, it is written by me, if my english is very bad, please to correct me, if you want to help me :smile:
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 815 OTT
    .

    On this day and so many other days songbirds are poached.

    http://jackelliot.over-blog.com/2017/03/songbirds-poaching-in-cyprus.html

    .
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,708 mod
    whoisdead said:

    Last year today, I stood in a hall with judges and audiences for a public speaking competition. It was the most terrifying, anxious and quite exciting day after a long while. It was my first time entering a public speaking competition so I was seriously nervous. Although I did not get qualified into the second round, it was a good experience because I was able to watch other competitors. It was fun too because I met new friends and I listened to their story of why and how they wanted to join this competition.

    Wow, I imagine that you learned a lot from that event. It takes a lot of courage to stand up in front of lots of people and speak. I always struggle when I have to speak at conferences.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 900 ✭✭✭
    > @takafromtokyo said:

    > @Practical_Severard
    > Speaking of square root, we did the same here in Japan. We never used the figures themselves in calculations.
    That's the rational choice. Math is the same, whether it's Russia or Japan.

    > I think it made kids feel nice about themselves when they could recite quite a few digits of square roots. In Japan, we even have a pun for each square roots of up to I forgot exactly, and all the kids were like in a race to memorize them and show off. That's what happened where I grew up.

    Well, I can understand this. Though, here older children have to deal with pi, they have usually overgrown the desire to show off one's memorising abilities. I'd say 5-9 y.o. children tend to like it, but that's about verses.
  • nuurussubchiynuurussubchiy Posts: 259 ✭✭✭
    16th of March is the only day in a year that sixteenth day of third month of the year
  • mheredgemheredge Teacher Here and therePosts: 31,060 mod
    On the 16 March, 2014 the was an online poll to measure the opinions of Venice and the surrounding area on their views on breaking away from the rest of Italy. Opinion polls suggested up to two-thirds of the region's population was in favour of independence but none of the polls conducted were considered legally binding.
  • jackelliotjackelliot Posts: 815 OTT
    Yesterday in America some workers won a case over overtime using the Oxford comma in their defence ..

    http://jackelliot.over-blog.com/2017/03/the-oxford-comma-controversy.html
  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 11,023 mod
    @jackelliot @prateek @takafromtokyo

    On March 17, 1845, Stephen Perry received a patent for the rubber band.
    Stephen Perry was a 19th-century British inventor and businessman. His corporation was the Messers Perry and Co, Rubber Manufacturers of London, which made early products from vulcanized rubber.


  • PaulettePaulette Posts: 11,023 mod
    @jackelliot @takafromtokyo @prateek

    St. Patrick's Day (Lá Fhéile Pádraig) is the National Day of Ireland annually on 17 March. Commemoration of Saint Patrick, the most important saint of Ireland.
    Everywhere in Ireland and throughout the world, this is celebrated by the Irish with outdoor concerts, carnival, a big parade and fireworks on the River Liffey in Dublin. Green is the color that is associated with the festival. Partygoers usually wear green clothing and example, one can buy green beer on this day.
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 767 ✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge
    I didn't know of the referendum. I wonder if Europe is now returning to the medieval ages.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 6,708 mod
    I think everyone will enjoy St Patrick's Day today! I know a lot of people who are going out to celebrate it, and I sure that lots of alcohol will be consumed.
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