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Slow vs fast

mheredgemheredge WordsmithHere and therePosts: 23,498 mod
Do you lose patience easily if things are going more slowly than you'd like? Do you ever get exasperated when walking with someone who is going so slowly that you wonder if you'll ever get to wherever you're going?

Slow drivers, slow Internet, slow queues at the bank—they all can make us feel impatient, even stressed. But slow things drive us crazy only because the fast pace of society has warped our sense of time. In the past, things that seemed quick and efficient now drive us around the bend. 'Patience is a virtue that’s been vanquished in the Twitter age.'

What things do you find annoy you most with the pace of life these days? How obsessed are you by punctuality, by meeting deadlines, or by doing things as quickly as possible? Or do you find that you never have any problems with how fast or slow things are moving? (Maybe this relates to the question about preferring the city or rural life).

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/why-your-brain-hates-slowpokes-860534259


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Comments

  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,668 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    One of my new year's resolution is time management. LOL

    I personally feel that we can determine the pace of life when it comes to a daily routine but we cannot determine it whilst we are dealing with technology i.e. If I will have to send an urgent email to my client and internet speed is slow like a slug so I wouldn't be able to control my pace because I depend on internet speed unless I have another way to send my message.

    We are impatient when we feel that things especially technology is not working according to our expectations or mindset that is where we feel frustrated or stress out sometimes.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    I don't have much patience at all at the moment, so I like things to be done as and when I want them done. I always have things that I need to do, and a set schedule, and I don't like to move too far away from that at any point if I can help it.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    I have a lazy streak in me, so when I'm feeling this way, I am happy to do everything nice and slowly. It never lasts very long though. When I get moving, then I can be irritating in wanting to get everything done but yesterday.
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 313 ✭✭✭
    In my work experience, competent people are often patient with other people's slowness, while they do their own work very quickly. I think they understand people have different paces. So they manage work so well that they don't have to wait around until other people finish their work.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod

    In my work experience, competent people are often patient with other people's slowness, while they do their own work very quickly. I think they understand people have different paces. So they manage work so well that they don't have to wait around until other people finish their work.

    Yes, I think this is true. A bit of patience can go a long way in the workplace, and I think that people who have this type of patience are much more likely to do well than those who don't have it.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    I agree @Yellowtail, except when there is a deadline and the boss is getting impatient that the job won't be finished in time.

    In Nepal, time is very elastic. Nothing gets done as quickly as it is promised. Deadline? I'm not sure if this word exists in Nepali.
  • martelmartel Posts: 4
    hi, that is a great article about our time perception. I can say that I used to get frustrated about slow drivers or walkers, but then thanks to deep breathing and meditation-like practice I managed to control my emotions a bit better
  • mpassalampassala Posts: 86 ✭✭
    Nice article, i strongly agree with the fact that today's pace changed pace of our expectations, so that for each action we perform, we suddenly want to see an immediate outcome. This is true in many workplaces where bosses will expect results and employee growth in short time, while employees will look forward a reward or a advancement in rank for every action they do.

    @mheredge : i think in many non westerly countries deadlines are looser and life is less frenetic, i think that is the cost for wanting to be more and more efficient. I wonder if this efficiency we crave is worth the stress we collect every day...
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    The pressure of work can be very stressful. Deadlines, targets and competition, and then add to this job insecurity caused by failure to meet the employers' expectations @mpassala.

    My biggest problem is when the internet is too slow. In Nepal it is very slow everywhere.

  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,625 ✭✭✭✭
    Not everything goes slowly makes me crazy. For instance, I like to eat a meal slowly. Sometimes slow and steady wins the race. Am I off the topic?
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    I like eating slowly @Shiny03, especially when I'm with friends. I also quite like slow trains as then you can see the passing scenery. With high speed trains it all goes past in a blur.
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,625 ✭✭✭✭
    edited January 8
    Speaking of slow train, I highly recommend this railway line, Gono Line, in Japan. @mheredge
    http://www.jnto.go.jp/eng/location/routes/g_route/golden_16.html

  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    I sent the link to Pete and Sue @Shiny03 though I don't know if they will be anywhere near to ride this scenic train. I plan to catch the train back to Ho Chi Minh City from Hue, which is a journey that takes about 24 hours along the coast. I'm flying up in about an hour and a half!
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,625 ✭✭✭✭
    edited January 9
    I don't think they would go there, because it's far away neither from Tokyo nor from Osaka. But I have another recommendation, Sagano Scenic Railway in Kyoto. @mheredge
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagano_Scenic_Railway
    https://www.sagano-kanko.co.jp/english.php

    I haven't talked to them for a while. Would you please say hello to them for me? Thank you.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    I've sent this to them too @Shiny03.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    mheredge said:

    The pressure of work can be very stressful. Deadlines, targets and competition, and then add to this job insecurity caused by failure to meet the employers' expectations @mpassala.



    My biggest problem is when the internet is too slow. In Nepal it is very slow everywhere.



    Because I work online from home, slow internet annoys me a lot - because it means it takes me longer to complete work, and therefore my hourly rate of pay falls.. which isn't good at all!
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    I totally sympathise @GemmaRowlands. I remember doing some work in Cambridge rather than Kathmandu, where I normally was working. I was developing an online library of documents on mountains and I was more than twice as productive because of the faster internet.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    mheredge said:

    I totally sympathise @GemmaRowlands. I remember doing some work in Cambridge rather than Kathmandu, where I normally was working. I was developing an online library of documents on mountains and I was more than twice as productive because of the faster internet.

    Yes it makes such a difference. Whenever I am going on holiday I always have to double check that there is going to be good internet wherever I go.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    It's impossible to know how each hotel's connection will work, even in a country that has generally good internet. My friend who's in India right now was frustrated last night because she was staying somewhere where it wasn't very fast. (She's never been to India before).

    Sometimes it's nice to go somewhere where there's no signal. It's a very good break to be disconnected for a change.
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,625 ✭✭✭✭
    edited January 11
    We go crazy when the internet is slow. It was me when I was in Lynne's session.


  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    I went a bit crazy this evening when my hotel said their internet wasn't working. Thank goodness practically every restaurant here has good wifi @Shiny03. I'm very pleased too, the service is slow.
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,625 ✭✭✭✭
    Good wifi + slow service...wow, how lucky you were. @mheredge :smiley:
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    mheredge said:

    It's impossible to know how each hotel's connection will work, even in a country that has generally good internet. My friend who's in India right now was frustrated last night because she was staying somewhere where it wasn't very fast. (She's never been to India before).



    Sometimes it's nice to go somewhere where there's no signal. It's a very good break to be disconnected for a change.

    I always check reviews online for places I'm staying at, just to make sure that nobody has had an issue with the connection in the past.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    It's a temporary blip with their provider @GemmaRowlands, so unexpected and I definitely won't make any comment in any feedback as it wouldn't be fair. The staff have been amazing and let me use their office laptop in the reception, so I can't complain as I've been able to book all my flights and accommodation for the next few days, plus another cooking class for Saturday.
  • filauziofilauzio Posts: 1,283 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I think that one's perception of how fast things are going all around us, has to do with the degree technology has been put into our lives.
    Besides the degree it has subsequently branched off in any aspects of our life.
    Therefore a person who isn't that much familiar with the wonderful digital world yet, could have a perpetual feeling of be lacking some very important technological devices and keep gasping and trouble over these kind of highly advertised supposed needs.
    Most probably it depends on the fact I'm old and belong to the rearguard, but despite the fact I really envy people who can manage all this digital stuff at a time, I'll keep my slow pace.
    Among the swarm of bees skimming hastily from flower to flower, sweeping the grassland, I'd rather be a grass-hopper which jumps here and there, taking its rest on one flower, admiring and smell and possibly sucking their nectar, one at a time.
    Once I recall suddenly and unexpectedly broke off my marching among the crowd of people hurrying along the tunnel leading to the underground station: the people kept on dodging in passing me, while glancing at me with suspicion bordering on fear.
    I'm wondering what might have happened had I made a turn about starting off in the opposite direction, as I was acting as a friction to slow their speed.
  • mohit_singhmohit_singh Posts: 1,276 ✭✭✭✭
    Slow buses makes me irritating. I used to travel a lot in buses but sometimes bus keeps me late in reaching the destination.
  • filauziofilauzio Posts: 1,283 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The first part of the article at the head of this thread has very interesting points.
    It says that patience and impatience had an evolutionary purpose: they worked as a yin ( soft female inactive force ruling the world ) and yang ( strong male active force ruling the world ) balance which made up our finely set internal timer.
    It's main aim was to prevent the human beings from spending too much time in unrewarding activities, to stay too longer in places where they could be in for a danger to come.
    When the timer went buzz then, it was the alarm warning them it was time to leave, therefore preventing their possible death.
    Useful, in prehistorical age, when perhaps a tyrannosaurus was striding, tramping along, towards the spot where the couple of troglodytes were foraging about, to break in unpleasantly out of the blue.
    Useful to be allowed to depend on such an instinctive alert when the phone ones weren't running yet.
    However, now the society's pace has accelerated so much, our internal timer dealing both with patience and impatience is no longer useful.
    The speed of society continually create us expectations which can be hardly rewarded properly fast or not at all: this cause us to feel the wait is stretching almost to the point of mocking at us with the consequence of our inner timer summoning rage upon whatever form of delay.
    Frustration, stress and probably, in the long term, high blood pressure could be brought by this continual feeling of being late.
    Sometimes, you could get in a long queue and perhaps your phone has ceased working because the battery is uncharged; well, don't get in a flap, just do the thing which nowadays, has got really old fashioned: thinking.
    You could just try recollect and send back in memory something you read of late, be it novel, poetry or even news; be sure your turn will come sooner than you would ever expect.
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 313 ✭✭✭
    I am a fast walker. When I was young, on the way to the office, I was always stranded in a jammed sidewalk, and thought getting irritated: "Why are people so lazy? They are so incompetant that they couldn't get a busy job, unlike me, so they are idle!"
    Of course that is totally wrong. Later I learned that if I manage my time well, and spend my time efficiently, I will be more patient with those inevitable waiting. Actually I realized impatience comes from frustration not with other people, but with myself.
    Now I am still a fast walker, even sometimes run on the road (not exercise, just to save time). But I never get annoyed with walking among crowd any more.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    I find it takes more effort to not go with the flow, and dash around like a mad thing all the time @filauzio. But I fear for those angry, demented bees buzzing around that fast living means they're likely to miss out on a lot of the richness of life. I try to allow plenty of time to reach wherever I want to go, as then I don't feel stressed and can enjoy the journey. I think the problem these days is that people rely too much on being able to cut things fine and then get frustrated when things delay them.

    Maybe it might help to meditate!

    I actually quite like slow trains and buses @mohit_singh as long as you've allowed plenty of time and aren't late. Yesterday the bus to the airport in Saigon was very slow because of the rush hour traffic, but it was also very interesting watching the motorbikes flowing along the roads so fluidly.

    Like you @Yellowtail, in town I tend to walk very fast (not so when I'm hiking in the countryside however). I sometimes get a bit frustrated by people strolling along aimlessly or slowly, but I just overtake them by saying 'escuse me', which usually seems to work. On the other hand when I'm out hiking, I might walk fairly fast along the flat, but up or down, I'm happy to plod along quite slowly.
  • kartikkartik Posts: 8
    I hate when I stand in a que and no one is moving. Sometime it is stopped for lunch, sometime for tea, etc etc that really kills me to wait that much. But if I got a good company then I will tolerate that catastrophe and that's not a much problem so totally it depends on the condition where you are waiting and for what you are waiting
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