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"The April rain, the April rain,
Comes slanting down in fitful showers,
Then from the furrow shoots the grain,
And banks are fledged with nestling flowers;
And in grey shawl and woodland bowers
The cuckoo through the April rain
Calls once again."

Mathilde Blind, April Rain
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Some work-related phrasal verbs

Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 285 ✭✭✭
edited September 2016 in Phrasal Verbs
Well, I've picked up all of the following in The Guardian's article (https : //www. theguardian. com / world/2016/sep/06/new-zealand-needs-migrants-as-some-kiwis-are-lazy-and-on-drugs-says-pm , delete the extra spaces if you want to check it up)

The definitions are taken from the Oxford online dictionary (http: //www. oxforddictionaries. com)

TURN UP (Put in an appearance; arrive)
“Go and ask the employers, and they will say that some of these people won’t turn up for work"

BRING IN (involve (someone) in a particular activity)
1)Every year New Zealand brings in more than 9,000 seasonal workers.
2) We brought in beneficiaries from Auckland a few years ago for jobs.

LET DOWN (Fail to support or help someone as they had hoped)
TIME AFTER TIME (also time and again or time and time again)
Leon Stallard, the owner of an apple orchard in Hawke’s Bay, said he had tried “for years” to get unemployed New Zealanders to pick his apples but had been let down time and again.
[articles for me - THE owner (this owner, we know him exactly by his name) of AN orchard (ONE OF the orchards in Hawke's Bay) ]

TO GET SOMEONE INTO WORK, TO GET SOMEONE TO DO SOMETHING (Move or come into a specified position, situation, or state)
MAKE IT (Consider to be; estimate as)
1)Our social conscience dictates that we make it a priority to get young people into work.
2)Leon Stallard, the owner of an apple orchard in Hawke’s Bay, said he had tried “for years” to get unemployed New Zealanders to pick his apples.

BANG ON (British informal "Exactly right")
“I agree 100% with Key’s comments, he’s bang-on,” said Stallard.

SHOW UP. ( Arrive for an appointment or at a gathering)
So if workers don’t show up, that hugely affects the business.

WRITE OFF (Dismiss someone or something as insignificant)
“There are a whole heap of young people who some employers and clearly the Government – Bill English and John Key now – write off as ‘pretty damn hopeless'"

Comments

  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,874 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    This is a common phrasal verb in my office. But, usually people take it as a fun. :)

    TURN UP (Put in an appearance; arrive)
    “Go and ask the employers, and they will say that some of these people won’t turn up for work"
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 285 ✭✭✭
    > @Bubbly said:
    > This is a common phrasal verb in my office. But, usually people take it as a fun. :)
    >
    > TURN UP (Put in an appearance; arrive)
    > “Go and ask the employers, and they will say that some of these people won’t turn up for work"

    Apparently, it happens everywhere:

    http: // learn-english-forum .org/ discussion/3507/ long-lunch-spanish-civil-servant-skips-work-for-years-without-anyone-noticing #latest
  • peaceculture2peaceculture2 Posts: 1,300 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well, I've picked up all of the following in The Guardian's article (https : //www. theguardian. com / world/2016/sep/06/new-zealand-needs-migrants-as-some-kiwis-are-lazy-and-on-drugs-says-pm , delete the extra spaces if you want to check it up)



    The definitions are taken from the Oxford online dictionary (http: //www. oxforddictionaries. com)



    TURN UP (Put in an appearance; arrive)

    “Go and ask the employers, and they will say that some of these people won’t turn up for work"



    BRING IN (involve (someone) in a particular activity)

    1)Every year New Zealand brings in more than 9,000 seasonal workers.

    2) We brought in beneficiaries from Auckland a few years ago for jobs.



    LET DOWN (Fail to support or help someone as they had hoped)

    TIME AFTER TIME (also time and again or time and time again)

    Leon Stallard, the owner of an apple orchard in Hawke’s Bay, said he had tried “for years” to get unemployed New Zealanders to pick his apples but had been let down time and again.

    [articles for me - THE owner (this owner, we know him exactly by his name) of AN orchard (ONE OF the orchards in Hawke's Bay) ]



    TO GET SOMEONE INTO WORK, TO GET SOMEONE TO DO SOMETHING (Move or come into a specified position, situation, or state)

    MAKE IT (Consider to be; estimate as)

    1)Our social conscience dictates that we make it a priority to get young people into work.

    2)Leon Stallard, the owner of an apple orchard in Hawke’s Bay, said he had tried “for years” to get unemployed New Zealanders to pick his apples.



    BANG ON (British informal "Exactly right")

    “I agree 100% with Key’s comments, he’s bang-on,” said Stallard.



    SHOW UP. ( Arrive for an appointment or at a gathering)

    So if workers don’t show up, that hugely affects the business.



    WRITE OFF (Dismiss someone or something as insignificant)

    “There are a whole heap of young people who some employers and clearly the Government – Bill English and John Key now – write off as ‘pretty damn hopeless'"



    Thanks
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