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What is one to say about June? The time of perfect young summer, the fulfilment of the promise of the earlier months, and with as yet no sign to remind one that its fresh young beauty will ever fade.

Gertrude Jekyll
A swarm of bees in May
Is worth a load of hay;
A swarm of bees in June
Is worth a silver spoon;
A swarm of bees in July
Is not worth a fly.
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Neglectable vs Negligible

pryfllwydpryfllwyd The AnthropocenePosts: 1,405 mod
I came across someone using the word neglectable recently - my first reaction was to say that they were wrong - but were they ?

Most dictionaries seem to say that neglectable is an archaic form of negligible,
but when does the usage of a word become so infrequent that it is no longer correct ?

One could ask when is the usage of neglectable so infrequent that it is negligible?

I also note that my spell checker doesn't like it any more - it suggests "neglect able" or "neglect-able" (both wrong) but not negligible.

As a rule I would suggest that if a dictionary says a word is archaic then note the meaning so that you understand the text but don't use that word
- its what linguists say when a programmer would say "deprecated".

Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 25,707 mod
    I can imagine neglectable being a word that Charles Dickens' characters might use @pryfllwyd, or maybe would have passed into Indian-English. It has a lovely ring to it.
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