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The snowfall total in Moscow beats 50 years record

Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 243 ✭✭✭
A record amount of snow has fallen this January in Moscow as the "Moscow city news agency" learned from the Director General of the Moscow's and Moscow Region's Meteobureau Mr. Alexey Lyakhov. "An analysis of our last 50 years' records allows us to say that this January is the most snowy since the January of 1970 with its 100 cm of snow (39 3/8 inches). This January's total snowfall has already risen to 104 cm (41 inch) and the month isn't over yet, so the total can grow more. The 50 years average is 40-45 cm (15 3/4-17 5/7 inches)", said Mr. Lyakhov.

According to his words, much snow is good for the city's soil. "Much snow means much water for soil in spring. That's good for the city's greens and trees. Especially because a city's soil is usually dry", said Mr. Lyakhov.

www. mskagency.ru/photobank/gallery/2521181?page_size=50&page=1
www. mskagency.ru/photobank/gallery/2520717?page_size=50&page=1
(erase after the first dot in the links)
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Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,539 mod
    Brrr I don't like snow, especially in the city!
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 243 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > Brrr I don't like snow, especially in the city!

    Get good clothing and you'll find it funny. A sunny day with white snow at moderate freeze (-5-15 C) is great - much better than the Western European slush. Add skiing or skating to that.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,539 mod
    I suppose so but I'm not totally convinced @Practical_Severard. I remember once in Scotland in December one time when there was a lot of snow and I wanted to go hiking. We had to almost 'swim' through snow that was up to our waists. It was very difficult.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 243 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > We had to almost 'swim' through snow that was up to our waists. It was very difficult.

    Yes, it was surely difficult. Nobody walks on freshly fallen snow for long distances. You need skis or snowshoes for that. There are broader 'hunting' skis which don't require a prepared trail. Though, using the both (skis and snowshoes) requires a skill, like, e.g. cycling. Not much pleasure when you do it for the first time, but it pays back with a few workouts.
    If you in Scotland have snow on the ground for a month or more, you can take up skiing.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 5,907 mod
    @Practical_Severard, hi, are you from Russian?

    The other day I heard that the Russian people would never ever buy a died fish. They always buy a liveley one and take it or them home? I saw three or more in a plastic bag.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 243 ✭✭✭
    > @Hermine said:
    > @Practical_Severard, hi, are you from Russian?
    >
    > The other day I heard that the Russian people would never ever buy a died fish. They always buy a liveley one and take it or them home? I saw three or more in a plastic bag.

    Yes, I'm from Russia. Live fish is really on sale at the Russian fishmongers, usually at the largest ones. Several species (like the sturgeon) MUST be sold either alive or already processed, usually smoked. The fishmongers keep large aquariums in their shops to display the live merchandise. If there's a customer, an attendant would catch the desired fishes with a scoop net for him. But I wouldn't say that the live fish has the largest share in the fish sales. The chilled and, especially, frozen fish are bought way more frequently.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 5,907 mod
    @Practical_Severard, you recalled it exacely as I saw and heard it.

    Btw I am not from Russian.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,539 mod
    edited February 2016
    Do you have a lot of dried fish @Practical_Severard? I have seen a lot of this here in Asia. I suppose in the absence of refrigeration, this is also more practical. Not a problem right now in Russia I guess @Glorian.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 243 ✭✭✭
    > @mheredge said:
    > Do you have a lot of dried fish @Practical_Severard? I have seen a lot of this here in Asia. I suppose in the absence of refrigeration, this is also more practical. Not a problem right now in Russia I guess @Glorian.

    Yes, dried fish is popular as a snack for beer or vodka. Many male Russians are amateur fisherman, and bony small freshwater fish species (e.g. the roach, the rudd) make a large part of their catch. Those fishes are diffucult in cleaning and gutting and that's why they are almost always dried. All the dried fish that I've come across was homemade, while there is industrial product on sale.
    Other fish species are rare in the dried form. Probably they exist as ethnic or local dishes. The mains access is no issue in Russia.
  • GlorianGlorian Posts: 1,252 ✭✭✭✭
    I Support all mentioning about snow falling in Moscow this january, but there is another side! I had a drift on my car, it was fun. :joy:
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,868 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @Glorian I hope that you have cleared your driving test before a snowfall. :)
  • GlorianGlorian Posts: 1,252 ✭✭✭✭
    Indeed @Bubbly.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,539 mod
    Did you skid on the ice @Glorian?
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 243 ✭✭✭
    Icy acclivities are frequent in Russian courtyards and country roads. When I come across one, I always wish I have put nailed tyres on my car. But the most roads I use are cleaned using snow-melting salts, so I don't buy them.
  • GlorianGlorian Posts: 1,252 ✭✭✭✭
    Yes I do, just for fun, a little... don't be scared @mheredge! ;)
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,539 mod
    Do many people use snow chains @Practical_Severard? I know the Swiss are into using these. I used to have a Swiss boss who brought his over to use in Sussex when he was working in London. He was probably the only person in the Home Counties using them.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 243 ✭✭✭
    edited February 2016
    > @mheredge said:
    > Do many people use snow chains @Practical_Severard? I know the Swiss are into using these. I used to have a Swiss boss who brought his over to use in Sussex when he was working in London. He was probably the only person in the Home Counties using them.

    Not many, lorry/bus drivers and offroad sportsmen mostly. The latter can put the chains on as quick as you lace up your boots - they're so used to them.

    Passenger cars' tyres are changed twice a year - there're 'summer' and 'winter' tyres on sale, and the country's law requires the motorists to change. Lorries and buses don't do this, that's why the drivers keep the chains in their trunks for occasional use.

    Instead of snow-chains, the people use studded tyres (I referred to them as 'nailed' in the previous post), but not all of them, since studded tyres increase breaking distance on the clean asphalt, which is the most frequent situation in the cities.
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,868 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @Practical_Severard lucky one! We are deprived of this beautiful gift of God.
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 243 ✭✭✭
    Are, you from Pakistan, @Bubbly ? Have you been to Hundu Kush or Karakorum?
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,868 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @Practical_Severard Yes I am from Pakistan. I have visited northern areas where I could see Hindu Kush, and Karakorum and world's second largest peak K2 but I couldn't go there. I do hiking but due to extreme weather I dropped the idea of joining K2 hiking and trekking club. Though, I have shared few pictures of Northern areas here.

    http://learn-english-forum.org/discussion/3029/can-you-tell-me-about-any-pretty-places-in-your-country/p4
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 243 ✭✭✭
    > @Bubbly said:
    > @Practical_Severard Yes I am from Pakistan. I have visited northern areas where I could see Hindu Kush, and Karakorum and world's second largest peak K2 but I couldn't go there. I do hiking but due to extreme weather I dropped the idea of joining K2 hiking and trekking club. Though, I have shared few pictures of Northern areas here.
    >
    Well, no doubt, climbing a mountain over 7000 m like K2, requires much experience. Anyway, I think there are snowy places and not so steep places in the Pakistani mountains, at lower alts. Ski resorts are certainly possible there and probably you've got some.

    The issue may be to get there.
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,868 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @Practical_Severard the main issue is land-sliding and earthquake in these areas. I've been there in summer but these days all places and closed due to heavy snowfall.

    Where are you from?
  • Practical_SeverardPractical_Severard Posts: 243 ✭✭✭
    > @Bubbly said:
    > @Practical_Severard the main issue is land-sliding and earthquake in these areas. I've been there in summer but these days all places and closed due to heavy snowfall.
    >
    > Where are you from?

    Russia. I was born in Krasnoyarsk and moved to Moscow.

    https: //www.google.ru/maps/dir/Moscow/Krasnoyarsk,+Krasnoyarsk+Krai/@54.7081301,47.4610235,3z/data=!4m14!4m13!1m5!1m1!1s0x46b54afc73d4b0c9:0x3d44d6cc5757cf4c!2m2!1d37.6173!2d55.755826!1m5!1m1!1s0x5cd7afc9a1ff37e3:0xd597e1468fd647ff!2m2!1d92.8932476!2d56.0152834!3e0
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,868 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @Practical_Severard Nice to see you. You are our neighbours. :)
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,539 mod
    Landslides and avalanches have been quite a problem in Nepal this past year too @Bubbly and @Practical_Severard, especially following the earthquakes and tremors that have plagued the country since last April.
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,868 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge did you watch the movie Everest? It also depicted few issues faced by mountaineers due to avalanches and snow storm.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,539 mod
    That particularly year highlighted how thinks can go seriously wrong @Bubbly. There were too many big egos competing to get to the top and sense somehow got left behind.
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,868 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge Isn't it difficult for any person to risk his or her life just to conquer a peak like Everest. I never thought that it is so dangerous and people just put their lives in danger for this expedition. But, I couldn't get onething; Does Everest cover with snow throughout the year?
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,539 mod
    Oh it is dangerous @Bubbly, but if you can pay enough, someone can help you get up there. The most dangerous area is reckoned to be lower down above Base Camp crossing the Khumbu Glacier.

    There's snow from above Base Camp which is around 5,500m.
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,868 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @mheredge yes it is mentioned in the movie as well. There are guides as well who can help the mountaineers to cross those base camps till summit. It looks really fascinating. I don't know why didn't you think about it even you live close to that place. :)
This discussion has been closed.