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"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February
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Proverbs / Phrases / Idioms

RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited March 2016 in Words Words Words
I haven't found here nothing about proverbs and phrases so I think that this can be useful. Put some proverbs and phrases here and explain their meaning ;)
Post edited by Lynne on
«13456711

Comments

  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ✭✭✭
    You've got to be kidding me! When a true statement is ridiculous.
  • RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Thanks @Lynne for encouriging :) So with which one I can start?
    Maybe one of the essentials can be good enough for start: ''Practice makes perfect''- that mean that you have to practice a skill a lot to become good at it.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ✭✭✭
    edited January 2016
    As more you practice, you'll learn. You'll be more and better with learning.

    ------------------

    As you practice, you'll learn.

    The more you practice, the more you'll learn.

    You'll get better at learning.
    Post edited by Lynne on
  • RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    "Easy come, easy go."- When you get money quickly, like by winning it, it's easy to spend it or lose it quickly as well.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ✭✭✭
    It's correct. We can use this phrase not just in this case. When you get something easily, it can go away, soon.
  • RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    You've right @Csilla. I wrote one of the explanation for this proverb and this proverb can be explained with a lot of examples.
  • RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    ''A friend in need is a friend indeed''- this means that real friend is a friend who helps when one is in trouble.
  • RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    "Rome wasn't built in a day."- means doing important work takes a long time. So be patient.
  • FaridmadiFaridmadi Posts: 125 ✭✭
    what goes around comes around means:The results of things that one has done will someday have an effect on the person who started the events.
  • RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I think that I found the same @Faridmadi : ''You will reap what you sow''- it means that you get what you give, some kind of karma stuff.
  • FaridmadiFaridmadi Posts: 125 ✭✭
    @Rema yeah it seems so, allow me to ask about the word you use karma? is it an Arabic word?)))) :)
  • FaridmadiFaridmadi Posts: 125 ✭✭
    @Csilla oh i see, but still couldn't get its meaning and the last use by Rema
  • RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @Faridmadi According to Wikipedia: ''Karma is a Sanskrit word (Sanskrit is the primary sacred language of Hinduism)''
  • RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @Faridmadi Karma is belief that whatever you do comes back to you, e.g. if you do something good, something good will happen to you, and vice versa.
    Maybe my explanations aren't good, but I certainly know that one of them can help us: @Lynne, @mheredge, @NatashaT or @Bubbly
  • FaridmadiFaridmadi Posts: 125 ✭✭
    @Rema I am not very knowledgeable on this topic, yet i found this on internet:"Karma (car-ma) means the result of a person's actions as well as the actions themselves." and yes it has a Hindu origins..
  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 552 mod
    @Rema I think that´s a good explanation! Karma is the idea that what you do affects what happens to you. So if you do good things, good things should happen for you, and if you do bad things, then bad things will happen to you.
  • RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2016
    @NatashaT @Faridmadi I thik that this proverb is in relation with karma "Whatever happen happen with the reason'.'

    ----------------------

    "Whatever happens happens for a reason."
    Post edited by Lynne on
  • FaridmadiFaridmadi Posts: 125 ✭✭
    @Rema, yeah it sounds convincing))
    it has the same meaning with idiom that i mentioned above, what goes around, comes around)))
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,834 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @Rema Karma means actions and all actions are based on your intentions. If your intention is good, you will act accordingly and you will get back something good. Intention is the key. :)
  • FaridmadiFaridmadi Posts: 125 ✭✭
    @Bubbly we've got almost the same word in arabic in terms of word's spelling but it holds different meaning, it derives from the word karam means generous)) :)
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,834 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @Faridmadi we use word "neeat" for intention in Arabic and it has great importance in our life. My point of view was based on neeat as it is a focal point of every deed.
  • FaridmadiFaridmadi Posts: 125 ✭✭
    @Bubbly yeah indeed we use this word alot but in what context you mentioned this word)))))
  • RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @chyijung 'Have butterflies in your stomach'- it means that you ​feel very ​nervous, usually about something you are going to do.
  • RemaRema Posts: 987 ✭✭✭✭✭
    @Bubbly I think that I can make comparison between karma and intention according to your definition of karma: Karma can be tool and Intentions can be material for processing . Am I get it right?
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 29,834 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @Rema it is not a comparison but a relationship between karma and intention. Karma is nothing without intention and vice versa.
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