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Customs and Traditions of celebrating Christmas

Hey Guys!! Happy New year all
How did you celebrate the Christmas in your? ? What are the customes and traditions in your own country? ? :)
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Comments

  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    If you celebrate Christmas in your country, what do you do to celebrate?

    I always wake up early in the morning and exchange presents with my family. Then we spend the morning and afternoon preparing for our meal, which we then eat, and we will spend the evening watching television and eating chocolate. I enjoy my day, and I like our family traditions.

    What do you do on Christmas Day?
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    Christmas is just around the corner, so if you celebrate it in your country, when do you decorate your home for the festive period?

    We start in early December, and then take the decorations down on January 6th.

    What about you? How do you decorate your home, and when?
  • MeihuaMeihua Posts: 26 ✭✭
    hang out with friends
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    That sounds wonderful. I love to spend Christmas with the people who I care the most about, and friends certainly count as a part of that.
  • Igor_LoveraIgor_Lovera Posts: 310 ✭✭✭
    One Christmas day in England…

    On Friday 25th December, the people of Britain, like those of many other nations, will sit down and eat an enormous Christmas dinner. But why is what the British do at Christmas of interest? The answer is that they probably invented modern Christmas.

    THE FATHER OF CHRISTMAS
    The man responsible for this was the writer Charles Dickens, who published ‘A Christmas Carol’ in December 1843. This “novella” is about the Christmas spirit, the importance of being kind to other people. But Dickens invented many modern Christmas traditions, like giving presents, having a big dinner with your family and singing carols. Christmas cards also started at this time, although they were the invention of another Victorian gentleman, Henry Cole, Christmas cards also began life in 1843. They say that Dickens was “the man who invented Christmas.” When he died in 1870, another writer, Theodore Watts-Dunton, was walking in Drury Lane near Covent Garden. He heard a Cockney girl say: “Dickens dead? Then will Father Christmas die too?”

    CHRISTMAS EVE
    So how do the British celebrate Christmas? Christmas Eve is fun. Many people go to parties or to the pub. At midnight people go to Midnight mass at the local church. In this way they won’t see Father Christmas when he comes down the chimney with his presents. The more generous families leave him a glass of sherry and some delicious mince pies.

    CHRISTMAS DAY
    Some people also go to church on Christmas morning, but most prefer open their presents. They will start eating their “Christmas dinner” at around one o’clock. They will eat roast turkey, with stuffing and cranberry sauce, and then Christmas pudding with brandy butter. They will probably continue eating the turkey the following day, which is called Boxing day. Turkey at Christmas is a modern tradition. In the past people ate goose. This is evident from the nursery rhyme: “Christmas is coming, the goose is getting fat.”

    THE ROYAL MESSAGE
    At 3 o’clock many families will watch “the Royal Christmas Message” on television. This is when the Queen addresses the nation and the Commonwealth. This tradition began with her grandfather, George V, in 1932. He spoke on the radio to the nation and Empire. The man who wrote his speech was another famous writer, Rudyard Kipling. The Queen made her first televised Christmas broadcast in 1957.

    From SpeakUp Magazine, December 2015, by George Walmsley


    @Lynne @mheredge @NatashaT @GemmaRowlands @amatsuscribbler you are British so... what do you think about this article?

    Merry Christmas to all Network!

    Igor
  • Igor_LoveraIgor_Lovera Posts: 310 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2015
    Hello Gemma.

    During Christmas day I always have to work, because I own a restaurant and when people celebrate something, I work.
    Anyway, if I free, during Boxing day I usually go to my mother's home for Christmas dinner.
    However, my wife and I have a own special tradition.
    When I come back at home on 24th December, we watch togheter
    Monty Python's film 'Life of Brian'.

    Merry Christmas Gemma!

    -------------------

    Hello Gemma.

    On Christmas Day I always have to work, because I own a restaurant, and when people celebrate something, I work.

    Anyway, if I am free on Boxing Day I usually go to my mother's home for Christmas dinner.

    However, my wife and I have our own special tradition, when I get back home on 24th December, we watch
    Monty Python's film 'Life of Brian' together.

    Merry Christmas Gemma!
    Post edited by Lynne on
  • NatashaTNatashaT Posts: 497 mod
    edited December 2015
    @Igor_Lovera Actually, I´m not British - I´m Australian!! But since we were an English colony, we share a lot of the same Christmas traditions. Many people even continue with the big English Christmas lunch, even though the weather is very hot! Most people prefer to have cold meats and salads though, and have another ´Christmas in July´ where they cook the traditional, hot meal. I´ve always been happy that we kept Boxing Day too - one extra day off!
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 9,650 mod
    I always think of boxing as in the martial art, but Boxing Day is about the second day of Christmas when servants would receive gifts (in a box?) from their employers.

    By the way, Jamie Oliver makes a nice pie from the leftover of turkey. :)
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    It's pretty accurate @Igor_Lovera. I recall Boxing Day as a day of eating up the leftovers from the day before. Most employers let staff go home at lunchtime on Christmas Eve even though it's not an official holiday.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    I'm not sure where I'll be this Christmas Day, but I think I might be in Ho Chi Minh City. I might see if I can find a church to visit on Christmas Day. I'm sure there must be some somewhere there.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    It is a shame that you have to work @Igor_Lovera but it must be great to be able to help people enjoy their Christmas. And @mheredge wow, travelling at Christmas must be great fun, definitely something different that not many people do.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 9,650 mod
    I mostly had a night duty on Christmas Eve and sometimes on Christmas Day too.
    So I celebrated it with my colleagues and patients.
    The hospital would treat us with a special Christmas meal, then.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    It seems that there are no shortages of Christmas trees around in Vietnam as well as Cambodia. But for most people I think it will still be business as usual as there's no official holiday on the 25th of December.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    It is a shame that you need to work @April but I think it is always an honour to spend Christmas with the patients who you are treating, as they would obviously rather be at home with their families too.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 9,650 mod
    Right, @GemmaRowlands.
    In fact, I prefer having night duty, so I could escape from any other festive duty on Christmas Eve. :)
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    Well I am sure that there are lots of people who want Christmas Eve off work, so they would appreciate you wanting to work overnight!
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 8,490 mod
    Happy Christmas to you and yours too Igor.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    I don't blame you @april. I'm hoping to run away from the city for Christmas as there as too many foreigners here.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 9,650 mod
    I went food shopping this afternoon, it was quite crowded there and it will be like this for the next two weeks. :(
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,668 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    I went to one of my students home who arranged a Christmas party. I really enjoyed the dinner over there having variety of desi dishes. :)
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    It sounds as though you had a lovely time @Bubbly and I can't believe it's all over already, and tomorrow will be a new year. I like the start of a new year, as it always feels so full of promise and expectation for good things.
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,668 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @GemmaRowlands any plans for new year? :)
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    I celebrated new year at home @Bubbly as my friends were going to a party in another country and I didn't want to go. How did you celebrate?
  • BubblyBubbly Posts: 29,668 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    @GemmaRowlands at the office. Office management arranged a party on new year eve. We had a splendid lunch today.
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod
    That is very kind of your management to arrange a party for you @Bubbly that must have been a lot of fun for you indeed. Unfortunately, as I am my own boss, I have nobody to make a party for me, so my "office parties" are very lonely indeed as it is only me here!
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 8,490 mod
    The countdown to Christmas 2016 has begun, and I'm not sure what happened to the year!
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    Bah humbug as Scrooge used to say (Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens).

    I suppose I have never been big on Christmas as I have always used to hate its commercialisation. Once I left home, I tended to spend Christmas away on holiday, preferably in a country where Christmas is no big deal. My biggest problem now it that Christmas seems to have caught on even in countries where there isn't much Christianity!

    So what will I do for Christmas? Well since I will be in Thailand and my (atheist) friend might still be hanging out with me, I suppose we might have an extra nice dinner, but other than that I'm not really sure we'll do much more!
  • YellowtailYellowtail Posts: 313 ✭✭✭
    In Japan, Christmas eve is the day when couples go on a date. (On Christmas day, we do nothing.) Lonely guys leave the office earlier to pretend to have a date, and go back home and eat alone takeout chicken drumsticks and a cake from the supermarket. Well, actually that is what I did when I was young. :(
  • GemmaRowlandsGemmaRowlands Moderator Posts: 3,647 mod

    In Japan, Christmas eve is the day when couples go on a date. (On Christmas day, we do nothing.) Lonely guys leave the office earlier to pretend to have a date, and go back home and eat alone takeout chicken drumsticks and a cake from the supermarket. Well, actually that is what I did when I was young. :(

    That sounds brilliant. I think it's important to spend time as a couple at this festive time of the year, as you should always be trying to make the very most of your relationship when you can!
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 23,498 mod
    I have some cute ankle docks with Father Christmas heads and 'bah humbug' written on them which I have with me and which I'll wear on Christmas Day.

    >:)
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