Hello.

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Beautiful December

Now, when the garden awaits the return of spring
Now, when the silence is deep and blue
Now, when the winter has cast her spell again
Beautiful December, Beautiful December

Here, where the snow is as soft as a woolly lamb
Here, where the nightfall is deep and blue,
Here, where the stars are so bright, you reach for them
Beautiful December, Beautiful December

Child, may you sleep in gentle peace tonight
Dream of songs that rise on silken wings!
When you wake, enchanted by the snowspun light
Sing the songs that came to you in dreams,
Your beautiful December dreams
Don't forget to check the calendar(s) for session times. Sessions are held on different platforms, so be sure to find out where the session will take place:-

Speaking Practice

LEN English sessions:-
http://www.learnenglish.de/calendar/learnenglishcalendar.html

Listening Practice 24/7

English radio playlists:-
http://www.englishradio.be/musicevents/calendar.html

Lay Vs Lie !! (How to use them correctly)

Bilal.Bilal. Posts: 50 ✭✭
edited August 2015 in Words Words Words
'Lay' and 'Lie' these two words have always been the matter of confusion. Whoever says them, may speak them wrongly. If you're some one who is more concerned about writing and speaking carefully, So, this is the place for you. your communication skills will be strengthened by keeping them straight, so here's the lowdown. Lay's most common meaning is "to place (something or someone) down in a flat position." Lie's corresponding meaning is "to be in a flat position on a surface." Lay is transitive; it requires that the verb have an object; there has to be a thing or person being placed: Lay it down. Lie, on the other hand, is intransitive. It's for something or someone moving on their own or something that's already in position: You can lie down there. You can lie there all day.

That's tricky enough, but it gets worse when we start using the words beyond the present tense. Here's lay in context in tenses that show its principal forms:

I was told to lay the book down. I laid it down as I have laid other books down. I am laying more books down now.

And here's lie:

I was told to lie down. I lay down. I have lain here since. I'm still lying here.

Did you catch that? For lay, we have lay, laid, have laid, laying; for lie, we have lie, lay, have lain, lying. And then there's the unrelated verb meaning "to tell an untruth." That lie goes lie, lied, have lied, lying.

Yes, it's really that complicated. We apologize. If you want to brush up, focus on the present and past tense – they do most of the work by far – and check the dictionary entries when you're not sure.

And even if you are certain, give the other guy a break.


(Source:- Merriam-Webster.)

Comments

This discussion has been closed.