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Present Continuous Tense

HeknerHekner Posts: 1,486 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited January 2014 in The Tenses
Post edited by Lynne on

Comments

  • HeknerHekner Posts: 1,486 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2014
    Misreading I have spent today sitting in the 'Russian' area as I have spent today spelling 'Russian' .

    :-O
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,069 mod
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,069 mod
  • HeknerHekner Posts: 1,486 ✭✭✭✭✭
    "I’m still looking for reasons to love you.
    I’m still looking for proof you love me."
  • BobmendezBobmendez Posts: 392 ✭✭✭
    edited September 2014
    I have found one feature of English I should have known a long time ago. And I am mad about it! Many times I have studied the Continuous Tenses since school and none has told me that there are stative and dynamic verbs. How could they separate this information ???!!!
    That's why I could say 'I am trusting you' or 'I am wanting an apple'. Don't laugh! :p
    Now I know these verbs are stative which are not used in Continuous Tenses

    P.S. I started learning English in Soviet Union. Could they hide some tips on purpose to make the Iron curtain stronger? ;)
  • filauziofilauzio Posts: 1,435 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2014
    How could I say 'I want an apple' or 'I'd like an apple', if this of mine isn't an habit but just a wanting of this very moment ?
    Be this either a stative or a dynamic verb, to me it doesn't matter, for I' m wanting an apple right now.
    I'm not eager to become an apple-eater, I want to decide whether or not eating an app!e.

    If this desire of an apple sprang up while walking, wouldn't it be a dynamic desire, expressed by a dynamic verb ?

    I think it isn't so clear, @Bobmendez‌


    --------------------------------

    How can I say 'I want an apple' or 'I'd like an apple', if it isn't a habit, but just something I want at this very moment?

    Whether this is a stative or a dynamic verb, doesn't matter to me, because I want an apple right now. I'm not eager to become an apple-eater, I simply want to decide whether or not to eat an apple.

    If this desire for an apple sprang up while walking, wouldn't it be a dynamic desire, expressed by a dynamic verb?

    I don't think it's that clear, @Bobmendez‌.
    Post edited by Lynne on
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,069 mod
    edited November 2014
    @filauzio‌ and @Bobmendez‌

    I want an apple.
    I would really like an apple now.
    I fancy an apple.

    !Note - wanting - lacking in a certain required or necessary quality. So, by logical definition, I am wanting an apple = I am lacking an apple. :D
  • BobmendezBobmendez Posts: 392 ✭✭✭
    edited November 2014
    @filauzio, it is said here that some verbs can be used to show an action or a state, and you can choose what to emphasize, but, in some cases, the difference between an action and a state is not that obvious. I suspect they just made an agreement not to use an action with verbs like 'love, want,...' to escape arguing.
    Sometimes, that agreement is broken:
    McDonalds
    As far as I know, this slogan irritates many English teachers. Am I right, @Lynne?
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,069 mod
    What do you think @Bobmendez‌? If you want to sound like a MuckyD advert, please don't let me stop you.
  • BobmendezBobmendez Posts: 392 ✭✭✭
    edited November 2014
    I guess young lady could say 'My baby is wanting something' because there is a lot of action: crying, body wiggling, etc. When an adult wants something in such an animated way, people could think bad things about this person. How could ceremonious British allow this?! :D
  • filauziofilauzio Posts: 1,435 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I think you're right @Bobmendez‌

    Well perhaps I've got the point. I could say:

    'I fancy an apple' , when I'm thinking of something to eat.

    'I'd really like an apple now', when I've nearly got such a decision.

    'I want an apple', when, with Prussian's strength of character, I bit into an apple.

    Surely Bismarck wouldn't have ever told anyone : ' I'm wanting an apple right now... sorry I meant I'm lacking an apple'.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 5,986 mod
    I am studying a leaflet.
    I am not studying a laeflet.
    Am I studying a leaflet?
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,069 mod
    I am not studying a leaflet.

  • deedee Posts: 83 ✭✭
    I am cooking in the kitchen.
    I am not cooking in the kitchen.
    Am I cooking in the kitchen?
  • ivy123ivy123 Posts: 24 ✭✭
    I am trying to earn stars now.
  • HermineHermine Moderator Posts: 5,986 mod
    edited December 2015
    The day before Lynne asked me if I was eating, while our session was running and I told her that is not true*), I was ripping up a voucher which validity had already ended on Dez 2014. I found it that day in a drawer by the computer.

    *) I do not always eat during English lessions, just sometimes.;) And I try to do it secretley.
    Post edited by Hermine on
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,069 mod
    edited December 2015
    @Hermine - I realise you were completely innocent. Here's your correction:-

    A day ago, Lynne asked me if I was eating while our session was running, and I told her it was not true: I was ripping up a voucher that was no longer valid, it had already ended in Dec 2014. I had found it that day in a drawer by the computer.

    I do not always eat during our English session, just sometimes. And I try to do it discretely / secretly.
  • jay416jay416 Posts: 40 ✭✭
    edited December 2015
    She is baking cake and making cream of cake.
    She isn't baking cake and making cream of cake.
    Is she baking cake and making cream of cake?

    ----------------------

    She is baking a cake and making cream icing for it.
    She isn't baking a cake or making cream icing for it.
    Is she baking a cake and making cream icing for it?

    !Note - I'm not sure what you meant by "cream of cake".
    Post edited by Lynne on
  • Shiny03Shiny03 Posts: 2,737 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited July 2016
    A good song for practising the present continuous tense.
    (I'll sing this song when I'm going to die and pray God for leading me home safely.)

    I am Sailing-Rod Stewart
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