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Beautiful December

Now, when the garden awaits the return of spring
Now, when the silence is deep and blue
Now, when the winter has cast her spell again
Beautiful December, Beautiful December

Here, where the snow is as soft as a woolly lamb
Here, where the nightfall is deep and blue,
Here, where the stars are so bright, you reach for them
Beautiful December, Beautiful December

Child, may you sleep in gentle peace tonight
Dream of songs that rise on silken wings!
When you wake, enchanted by the snowspun light
Sing the songs that came to you in dreams,
Your beautiful December dreams
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Use of Latin abbreviations in English

ManLearnerManLearner Posts: 1,115 ✭✭✭✭
edited May 2015 in Words Words Words
We are using a lot of Latin abbreviations in English. For example e.g., etc., et al., C.V., Ph.D and many more. Most of them, we are using in scientific writings. What is their significance and are these exist in English literature too?
If you are aware of these abbreviations, you can share them.

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We use a lot of Latin abbreviations in English. For example e.g., etc., et al., C.V., Ph.D and many more. We use most of them in academic writing. What is their significance and do they exist in English literature too?
If you are aware of more abbreviations, you can share them.
Post edited by Lynne on

Comments

  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 9,639 mod
    Yes @ManLearner, the more common abbreviations can be found in English literature.

    Some more common ones are: i.e. / id / per cent / PS etc. :wink:
  • ManLearnerManLearner Posts: 1,115 ✭✭✭✭
    Thanks @Lynne Do all abbreviations belong to "Latin". Is there any abbreviation in English too?
  • nelnel Posts: 1,125 Inactive
    I think they are in English language but you said they belong to latin.
  • ManLearnerManLearner Posts: 1,115 ✭✭✭✭
    @nel we say "e.g" it is derived from Latin words "exempli gratia" which means "For example". Similarly we use AM or PM for time, these are also from Latin words.
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 30,131 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    PM AM are also Latin. I think every language adopts some words from other language.

    Is there any language that has not adopted a single word from other languages? @Lynne
  • ManLearnerManLearner Posts: 1,115 ✭✭✭✭
    I think Arabic.
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 30,131 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    I thought the same. :)
  • ManLearnerManLearner Posts: 1,115 ✭✭✭✭
    So you are stealing my thoughts :smile:
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 30,131 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    I steal ideas not thoughts. :p
  • ManLearnerManLearner Posts: 1,115 ✭✭✭✭
    Its a type of plagiarism.
  • ManLearnerManLearner Posts: 1,115 ✭✭✭✭
    What do you think about Acronyms, are they abbreviations?
  • BubblyBubbly Nightingale Posts: 30,131 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited May 2015
    I think its private issue of languages to adopt and use Acronyms and Abbreviations. Let Latin enjoy the company of English language. :)

    But again another question for @Lynne. Are these Latin acronyms and abbreviations are used only in British English or in American/Aus/Canadian English too?
  • ManLearnerManLearner Posts: 1,115 ✭✭✭✭
    Let the English enjoy the taste of Latin words.
  • nelnel Posts: 1,125 Inactive
    True.
This discussion has been closed.