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"The April rain, the April rain,
Comes slanting down in fitful showers,
Then from the furrow shoots the grain,
And banks are fledged with nestling flowers;
And in grey shawl and woodland bowers
The cuckoo through the April rain
Calls once again."

Mathilde Blind, April Rain
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Weird job interviews

FrankFrank ModeratorPosts: 5,639 mod
edited December 2014 in Work and Money
In a reaction to one of my articles about strange job interviews, for a management website, a director of a recruiting agency wrote about her experiences with the most weird job interviews. She reported that in her career she conversed with about 1200 candidates and mentioned the most strange talks she held. She had seen many candidates bursting out into tears when she asked them why they had not managed to get any further in their career so far. In one of the interviews an experienced salesman who applied for a job as a sales manager, was sitting for a whole hour with one elbow on the table and his other arm akimbo.

She had also seen several candidates coming in their motor suit for the interview. One of her job candidates appeared in his work wear with fresh paint on it. Apparently he was painting his house which he interrupted for a quick chat about his potential future job. There where women who cleaned their nails whilst sitting in the interview and there also was a man who pushed down his coffee twice because he could not control his gestures. Last but not least: in a warm summer there was a lady with a tiny blouse bending over bare-necked in her direction. The director of the recruiting agency said this woman might have enchanted a male recruiter, but the only thing she could do herself was laughing out loud. These people, she wrote, where all applying for management functions. Have you ever been in strange situations regarding job interviews?

Comments

  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,894 mod
    It wasn't so much a strange interview, as a comment on the times. I recall when I was a student being interviewed for a job with Barclays Bank. The guy kept asking me questions about what my parents did. I answered the questions but I was quite annoyed that this seemed to matter. A bit later I was asked for interview by Rothschilds and straight off I was told that I was the only woman they were interviewing and that so far no women worked there (that is, who weren't secretaries). In those days, they hardly even paid lip-service to gender equality. Ironically, I didn't go into the financial services industry till many years later, and this was more by accident than by design.
  • FrankFrank Moderator Posts: 5,639 mod
    edited December 2014
    In the time you mention, maybe it wasn't strange to talk about gender exceptions in a job interview @mheredge. Now it would be considered as rather inappropriate to do this. In former times the most important advantage employers saw to hire a woman was that she would be cheaper than a man. Women where not regarded to be smart enough to fulfil responsible tasks. You also didn't see that much women in higher management functions or in boards of directions. Sometimes you could even hear compliments like: 'You did an excellent job... for a woman.' The people who made the compliment apparently were convinced they made a nice compliment. Luckily this view has changed. I think in many functions women are still underpaid comparing with man, but this is also (slowly) changing for the better.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,894 mod
    I get the feeling that Rothschilds were only interviewing me to pay lip service to equality regulations. It didn't mean that they really wanted to employ women @lichaamstaal‌.
This discussion has been closed.