Hello.

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

"Still lie the sheltering snows, undimmed and white;
And reigns the winter's pregnant silence still;
No sign of spring, save that the catkins fill,
And willow stems grow daily red and bright.
These are days when ancients held a rite
Of expiation for the old year's ill,
And prayer to purify the new year's will."
Helen Hunt Jackson, A Calendar of Sonnet's: February
Don't forget to check the calendar(s) for session times. Sessions are held on different platforms, so be sure to find out where the session will take place:-

Speaking Practice

LEN English sessions:-
http://www.learnenglish.de/calendar/learnenglishcalendar.html

Listening Practice 24/7

English radio playlists:-
http://www.englishradio.be/musicevents/calendar.html

Christmas songs

LynneLynne Your TeacherHomePosts: 8,620 mod
Tagged:
«13

Comments

  • BobmendezBobmendez Posts: 392 ✭✭✭
    'She puts me down and I put up with her'
    Amazing! How much sence does the only verb make!
  • BobmendezBobmendez Posts: 392 ✭✭✭
    'I put up with her because I want her to put me up next 3 days'
    Is it ridiculous?
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,008 mod
    By saying that you do get along with your wife, you're emphasising the fact that you get along. I might be inclined to put 'but' instead of and, emphasising further the difference in your relationship with your mother-in-law.

    I do get along with my wife, but I put up with my mother-in-law. Of course the meaning changes depending on what you want to stress.

    You could also just state: I get along with my wife and I put up with my mother-in-law.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 9,764 mod
    I really hope that you get along with your wife, @Bobmendez‌ :), but what do you want to say with "you put up with your mother-in-law" here?
    Sorry for my question, but I am very bad in phrasal verbs.
  • BobmendezBobmendez Posts: 392 ✭✭✭
    @april‌
    Watch HERE
    Notice, 'put up with' and 'put up' have different meanings like 'come up with' and 'come up'.
  • SLBSLB Posts: 1,289 ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2014
    @Bobmendez‌ I watched the video and he didn't cover "put up", only "put up with"
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 8,620 mod
    edited October 2014
    For every rule, there will probably be an exception @SLB, but I can't think of one at the moment.

    There isn't one, yet @Bobmendez‌. Would you like me to begin one?
  • BobmendezBobmendez Posts: 392 ✭✭✭
    @Lynne It would be nice to have a discussion where everyone are twittering phrasal puzzles like aliens :D
  • BobmendezBobmendez Posts: 392 ✭✭✭
    @SLB About 'Put up' Watch HERE
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,008 mod
    I might put up a shelf, meaning I stick nails in the wall and hope that the shelf won't fall on my head.

    You have to put up with dogs barking all the time if you live in Kathmandu. It's such a nuisance being woken up all the time by their noise.
  • aprilapril Moderator Posts: 9,764 mod
    I had already a problem yesterday.
    Is it: Lynne will "kick me out the forum", or "Lynne will kick me out of the forum"? :)
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,008 mod
    I prefer the latter. I think the first is more American @april!
  • SLBSLB Posts: 1,289 ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2014
    To me the first seems incorrect.
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 8,620 mod
    edited October 2014
    Started by @Bobmendez‌.

  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 8,620 mod
    edited November 2014
    If you kick someone / something, the meaning is clear, you use your foot, add a preposition, and the meaning changes.

    For example: The footballer kicked the ball.

    To kick someone out means to force someone to leave a place or organisation.

    For example: The bouncer kicked them out of the club.

    Add another preposition to "kick out" and the meaning changes again.

    Isn't English fun? :smiley:
    Post edited by Lynne on
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 8,620 mod
    To put down is a dangerous one.

    You can put something you are carrying down.
    You can put down a baby when it's sleepy. http://www.netmums.com/baby/sleep/pick-up-put-down-technique
    You can also put down a sick animal that is suffering.

    Please don't confuse the last two.

    Pick up is also dangerous.

    :smile:
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,008 mod
    Be careful about what or who you pick up!
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,008 mod
    I think both are okay. Have you ever been kicked out of anything @SLB?
  • SLBSLB Posts: 1,289 ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 2014
    Only of computer games when I used to play. But once I was nearly kicked out of high school
    because I wasn't attending classes.

    btw, what happened? I recall you said something like "it's what I keep saying, Americans don't know how to speak English". Where did your comment go? @mheredge‌
  • spawnintegrityspawnintegrity Posts: 78 ✭✭
    > @SLB said:
    > Only of computer games when I used to play. But once I was nearly kicked out of high school
    > because I wasn't attending classes.
    >
    > btw, what happened? I recall you said something like "it's what I keep saying, Americans don't know how to speak English". Where did your comment go? mheredge‌

    I remember that too. Is it really gone?
  • spawnintegrityspawnintegrity Posts: 78 ✭✭
    > @SLB said:
    > spawnintegrity‌ I found it:
    > http://learn-english-forum.org/discussion/1532/ame-vs-bre/p1

    Yes I saw it just after my comment.
  • BobmendezBobmendez Posts: 392 ✭✭✭
    Do you see any mistakes in my sentences?

    'A friend of mine visited me last saturday. We had talked a lot before we understood that the last train is gone, so I put him up that night.'
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,008 mod
    The last train was gone. Otherwise the sentence is fine @Bobmendez‌.
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,008 mod
    Sir Bob Geldof and Midge Ure have announced Do They Know It’s Christmas? is to be covered for the fourth time. The that the Band Aid classic is this time to raise funds for the fight against Ebola in west Africa.

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/nov/10/band-aid-30-do-they-know-its-christmas-bob-geldof-ebola?CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2
  • LynneLynne Your Teacher HomePosts: 8,620 mod
    If you kick out at someone, you strike them with your foot.

    Lynne kicked out at @science24‌ in the phrasal verb session.

  • SLBSLB Posts: 1,289 ✭✭✭✭
    @Lynne‌ I don't know what you do in the phrasal verb sessions so I have to ask.
    Did you totally beat @science24‌ or did your avatar literally kick his?
  • BobmendezBobmendez Posts: 392 ✭✭✭
    edited November 2014
    If you get on well with someone you like them and have the same interests.
    If you get along with someone you have a good relationship with someone.
    Does anybody know the difference?
    I have seen 'get along well with' as well. I will not be surprised if there is something like 'stumble the same with' or 'twitter alike with'. Do we forum along with each other? :D
  • mheredgemheredge Wordsmith Here and therePosts: 24,008 mod
    I'd say that they all mean pretty much the same @Bobmendez‌.
Sign In or Register to comment.